Classical 91.1 FM

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Dr. William Yelverton is an award-winning classical guitarist who has performed in festivals and concert halls throughout the United States and Europe. He directs the guitar program at Middle Tennessee State University and is a visiting professor at the University of the South.

His program for this installment of Live in Studio C includes music from the Spanish Renaissance, an arrangement of keyboard music by Handel, a selection from Brazil, and a piece that was written by his former colleague at MTSU, Roger Hudson.

Stephanie Richard / via Flickr

The Nashville Symphony is nearly done digging itself out of a giant financial hole. After job cuts, salary reductions and restructuring, the symphony expects to no longer have a budget deficit, starting next year.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Cellist Xia-fan Zhang and pianist Robert Marler both teach at Belmont University and play with the Nashville Symphony. This episode of Live in Studio C features two selections from an upcoming performance in Belmont's faculty concert series, at 7:30pm November 16 in McAfee Concert Hall.


Bassoonery is a bassoon quartet made up of Patricia Gunter, Wilson Sharp, Andy Witherington and Harold Skelton.


Pianist Jerome Reed from Lipscomb University plays works by Victoria Bond and Einojuhani Rautavaara.


The Blair String Quartet plays works by Haydn, Dvorak and Steven Stucky


Members of Alias Chamber Ensemble flutist Philip Dikeman, hornist Leslie Norton and pianist Melissa Rose play music of American composer Rick Sowash

    

Chas Sisk

Flutist Kathryn Ladner, violist Chris Farrell and harpist Licia Jaskunas play a trio by Debussy and a new work by Chris Farrell.


Nina Cardona / WPLN

Nashville’s annual month-long arts celebration, called Artober, is taking a turn toward the reflective this year. In addition to encouraging performance groups and galleries to program special events all month, the Metro Arts Commission has charged a handful of writers and musicians with creating pieces inspired by the city’s public art.

Racial Equity Nashville Arts
Metro Arts

Updated at 4 p.m. Wednesday: This story has been updated for clarity and to link to a revised version of the Metro Arts report.*

Racism and elitism have been found in some of Nashville’s arts and culture organizations. The issues came to light in a series of interviews about whether the arts are accessible to the city’s increasingly diverse population, and now Metro is responding.

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