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This summer, listen back to the Nashville Symphony’s 2016-17 classical season, each Sunday night at 8:00 pm. Find a complete schedule of shows here.

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Cellist Nicholas Gold put his own spin on 19th century music during this week's Live in Studio C. First, he and Brian Eades followed the tradition of violin virtuoso Paganini as they improvised additions to a set of variations. Then fellow cellist Elizabeth Browne filled in for the orchestra in a reduction of music by Schumann.

Hans Wild / Image provided by the Britten-Pears Foundation (www.brittenpears.org) Ref: PH/5/127

The notion of the traveling musician is nothing new. From the transient troubadors of the 13th century to modern touring artists, musicianship and travel have gone hand in hand for centuries. 

Ed Lambert / Nashville Public Radio

Jessica Dunnavant, Sheri Hoffman and Yvonne Kendall play trios by Joseph Boismortier and Johann Quantz.

courtesy of the Nashville Symphony

Larry Trotter is a Knoxville pastor, and a former lead guitarist in a rock band. But on July 4th Trotter turns into the maestro of the downtown fireworks — the man who times the fireworks to the live music.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Two weeks ago, we heard performances by faculty teaching music students at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts. On this program, we get a taste of the talented high school juniors and seniors who have come from all over the state. 

Per Palmkvist Knudsen / Wikimedia Commons

Yes, you read the headline correctly — since 1989, June has been designated as National Accordion Awareness Month. Chances are, if you’ve ever been around an accordion, it’s difficult to not be aware of it; the instruments (and its many variants) are unique in both physicality and timbre. So why a whole month dedicated to them?

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week, a versatile young harpist from Wales stopped by Studio C on his way between a festival in New Orleans and a workshop in Louisville. At just 21, it would be impressive enough if Ben Creighton Griffiths only held the principal harp position for one professional orchestra, but he's got that job with two ensembles, plus parallel careers as a touring soloist in both the classical and jazz genres. Griffiths gave us a taste of the wide range of music he can tease out of a single instrument, from impressionistic classical and traditional Welsh to walking bass and modal jazz.

Wikimedia Commons

As composers in the mid-20th century began wild experiments in sound, the practice of traditional music notation became increasingly inadequate. How, for example, could the sound of John Cage’s amplified cactus, or the electroacoustic experiments of Pierre Schaeffer be effectively scored by notes on a staff?

As a result, the art of graphic notation — the use of shapes or patterns instead of, or together with, conventional notation — began. The scores generally fall in one of two categories: Some strive to communicate specific compositional intentions, while others are meant to inspire the performer’s imagination.

Here’s a look at a few graphic scores, the ways they’ve been interpreted by performers and how the tradition has evolved over the years.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Each summer, talented high school students from around the state gather in Murfreesboro to hone their visual art, theater, dance or music skills with college-level teachers at the Governor's School for the Arts. We got a taste of how much fun the faculty get to have, as professors from the music division performed lively selections together with their peers.

Wikimedia Commons

As dads across the country open homemade macaroni cards this Father's Day, take a look at some of the fathers throughout classical history that influenced—for better or for worse—the musical lives of their children. Some are famous composers themselves, others are best remembered for fostering musical talent in their kids. All were probably equipped with at least a few good dad jokes.   

Leopold Mozart

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