Transitioned | Nashville Public Radio

Transitioned

Kim Green

Many Tennesseeans were knocked to their knees by the recession. The economic turmoil sent the unemployment rate into the double digits, and resulted in thousands of foreclosures and bankruptcies in Tennessee. 

In 2011, Ann Jetton wasn't unique. She'd been jobless for almost two years. Here unemployment benefits were running out. But at age 56, she was holding out for more than just a job. 

Transitioned: 'I Love Music And Like The Law'

Jul 24, 2017
Kim Green / WPLN

Alison Prestwood was excited to begin her new life’s work. It was 2011. She’d had a great run as a session bass player. But Music Row’s fortunes were flagging. So in her late 40s, she decided to follow in the family business and go to law school.

Shane Burkeen / Actors Bridge Ensemble

 

In 2011, we aired a series called Transitioned about Tennesseans adapting to an economy in flux. Now, we're checking back in to find out what — if anything — has changed for them. 

Transitioned: Keeping My Calluses

Jul 23, 2011
Kim Green / WPLN

Fifty-three-year-old Alison Prestwood leads a double life. She’s a newly-minted lawyer and a veteran bass sideman who has loved making music for as long as she can remember.

She recalls a photo taken of her when she was a toddler. “I’ve got on this crazy majorette outfit, you know, my hat is askew and I think I’ve got a black eye,” she says. “But I’ve got a little guitar in my hand, and so I know that for whatever reason, guitar was just it for me from nearly day one.”

Transitioned: Nobody Can Survive Without Backup

Mar 22, 2011

Two years ago, with unemployment on the rise, Rachel Agee was grateful to have a job. She worked at a law firm, producing training videos, including ones about, ironically, how to properly fire someone. “Pretty much everything that the training video tells you to do, yeah, that didn’t happen,” says Agee.

The company terminated her, without warning, in February of 2009. “The first thought that popped into my head,” she says, “was ‘Oh god, how am I going to pay my mortgage?'”