transit | Nashville Public Radio

transit

David Briley
File / WPLN


Nashville Mayor David Briley says he's setting to work on a new plan for mass transit in Nashville following this week's defeat of a $5.4 billion proposal featuring light rail.

Briley says he's already spoken with some opponents of the failed transit plan, and he intends to push forward with improvements to the city's bus system. He says Nashville's competitiveness depends on the city having a working transportation system.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN


Now that it's decided that Nashville won't expand its transit system, the head of the MTA says his team must continue looking for other ways to improve.

 

Steve Bland expects to analyze the election results and come back to voters again. Bland says he's "absolutely certain" that traffic congestion is getting worse, so whatever proposal comes next will likely have the attention of even more Nashvillians.

One of the most important — and complex — pieces of Nashville’s mass transit proposal is its funding strategy. There’s been significant focus on proposed increases to four local taxes, which would partly fund the projects. Yet those taxes are only a portion of the plan.

So how, in total, would the transit overhaul be funded? And if the financing projections are off target, how would Metro adjust?

Nashville bus MTA
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

If passed, Nashville's multi-billion dollar transit plan, up for a vote May 1, would be the largest civic project the city has ever undertaken — yet polls show a large number of Nashvillians are still undecided. We want to know what would help you make a decision. 

Sara Ernst / WPLN

As Nashville gears up for the May 1 transit referendum, Tennessee labor leaders banded together to announce their official support of the plan. They claim that the multi-billion dollar proposal — which includes a light rail, a downtown tunnel and rapid-bus routes — will create jobs, encourage better employee reliability and decrease worker turnover.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Both sides in the debate over Nashville's proposed mass transit plan say the referendum scheduled for May 1 should go forward, despite Mayor Megan Barry's surprise announcement Tuesday that she's stepping down after pleading guilty to felony theft in connection with her extramarital affair.

Nashville transit
Nashville Mayor's Office

It’s official: Nashville voters will get the chance to decide whether to raise taxes to pay for the mayor’s plan for mass transit.

The Metro Council finalized a referendum Tuesday night so that increases to four kinds of taxes will appear on the ballot on May 1.

Mayor Megan Barry nashville
Mayor's Office of Nashville

There’s been a steady stream of Nashville transportation announcements lately, along with studies and op-ed articles. Now the public gets the chance to comment on the city’s multi-billion-dollar mass transit proposal.

Nashville Charlotte Avenue
nMotion

After drawing some criticism, Mayor Megan Barry is now proposing a longer light rail line along Charlotte Avenue between downtown and West Nashville.

California Department of Transportation

Driverless cars may still be a few years away, but Tennessee highway officials say they're already starting to invest in intelligent technologies to help with congestion woes.

Pages