Science and Technology

Science news

Lily William / WPLN

There's an effort underway to demolish old dams in order to allow creeks and streams to flow more freely. Tuesday morning a team led by *Cumberland River Compact took down a four-foot tall barrier of stone and mortar that stretched across Seven Mile Creek near Brentwood.

Courtesy of Google

 

Google Fiber’s announcement last week that it’s finally starting to install high-speed Internet service stirred up a little buzz. The tech giant has a Nashville fan base that can’t wait to get ahold of its fiber-optic option. As Google enters the scene, Internet providers are battling for the best reputation in the new gigabit market.

12 South resident Michael Harrington is ready to join the “Fiberhood.”

 

“I think it’s fantastic, it’s the greatest thing," he says.

Nicola via Flickr

Some parents bemoan the fact that their kids play too many video games, but researchers from the University of Tennessee say one growing gaming genre might be good for health. They measured children's energy output playing outside compared to playing "active video games."

Music City Center rooftop bees
Chas Sisk / WPLN

Eight stories above Nashville's SoBro neighborhood, beekeeper Jamie Meredith gently works a wooden frame free from a small box.

He holds it up, showing hundreds of bees on this frame alone. Many have their heads buried deep in a honeycomb.

"You can see that it's filled with honey," Meredith says. "And they seem to be doing really quite well."

Emily Siner / WPLN

Nashville is hosting two conferences during consecutive weeks for technology entrepreneurs and investors. On the surface, the dueling events seem nearly identical, but they're trying to differentiate themselves after a contentious split.

Vanderbilt University

Researchers at Vanderbilt University may have found the next generation of technology to protect against identity theft. The key, they think, is in a tiny spiral, about one-hundredth the size of a single piece of hair, that could be embedded on credit cards or currency to prevent counterfeit.

Emily Siner / WPLN

In an announcement with much fanfare but not many details, AT&T said this morning it’s rolling out gigabit-speed internet to some Nashville-area customers starting Monday.

The announcement at the AT&T building downtown featured a brass quartet heralding visitors. The mayor attended, as did country music artist Drake White, who played a sendoff song. AT&T Tennessee President Joelle Phillips beamed as she spoke about the new service.

City of Tullahoma

One of the things the city of Tullahoma is proud of is its waste collection.

Yes, you read that correctly.

The Middle Tennessee town touts its recycling program, which accounts for about a third of its waste. Now it’s adding another way to get rid of trash sustainably: composting. 

Annie Clements, a longtime Tullahoma resident, already sets aside organic waste like food scraps and plant trimmings to decompose, the process known as composting.

Emily Siner / WPLN

To write a great country song, they say, you need three chords and the truth. These days, you may also need a few self-produced albums, a dozen social media accounts and several thousand online fans before you can get anyone to listen to it. 

In a music industry revolutionized by the Internet, aspiring artists are trying to balance their work as musicians with the increasing demands of social media.

Entrepreneur Center

 

Nashville’s Entrepreneur Center, a nonprofit that acts as the city's technology hub, has picked a venture capitalist with strong ties to the healthcare industry as its new CEO.

Stuart McWhorter is co-founder of a Brentwood investment firm, Clayton Associates, that works with early-stage companies. The firm runs an investment fund which operates in the Entrepreneur Center. 

McWhorter — who also founded OrthoLink, a management company for orthopedic doctors — acknowledges that healthcare is a cornerstone of the technology industry in Nashville.

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