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Science and Technology

Science news

Natasha Senjanovic / WPLN


Tim Wildsmith isn’t your typical Southern Baptist youth minister. He's used to holding thorny discussions on issues that the youth group members of Nashville’s First Baptist Church face, like dating and sex. Now, science has been added to that list — namely, how it can and does coexist with faith.

Cumberland Island National Seashore / National Park Service

Tim White works for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

That puts him on the front line of any change in the state's fauna, including the arrival of armadillos.

Reader Of The Pack via Flickr

The latest research from a Vanderbilt University neuroscientist has some potentially controversial findings, depending on your pet preference: Suzana Herculano-Houzel's team found that dogs have more neurons in their cerebral cortex than cats.

But does this mean dogs are smarter? Not necessarily.

courtesy Wikimedia Commons

A Vanderbilt researcher is looking to an unlikely drug in the ongoing fight to stop Alzheimer’s disease in its initial stages.

Emily Siner / WPLN

For such a small school, Fisk University attracts a lot of funding for scientific research.

This is the second year in a row that it's been ranked in the top five liberal arts schools in the country in terms of research dollars, according to Washington Monthly's rankings. It's in part due to the historically black college's efforts to recruit faculty who embrace the school's focus on students but still win big grants.

TenneSwim

A scientist who happens to be a world-class distance swimmer has traveled the length of the Tennessee River — all 652 miles of it, through multiple states.

Emily Siner / WPLN

There was a highly anticipated announcement yesterday after months of little information — and no, we're not talking about Taylor Swift's new album.

Google Fiber told residents of Sylvan Park that its gigabit speed service is finally available. But even for some Fiber fans, the wait proved too long, especially as other telecomm companies lined up for their business.

Taylor Slifko / APSU

One of the universities closest to the center of totality will document how animals on campus will react to the sudden darkness of Monday's total solar eclipse.

Researchers from Austin Peay State University's agriculture department will record observations on university cattle, bees and crickets.

Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel

The eclipse passing over Nashville in less than two weeks seems to have everyone's attention now.

But we know there are some of you out there that still just don’t understand what all the hype is about. That’s why we’re going back to the basics: answering five questions that you may have felt too afraid to ask at this point.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory hope a new federal grant will help them turn plants into fuel. The Department of Energy announced this week that it's providing $12 million next year to the lab in East Tennessee, with the potential for more than $100 million over the next five years. 

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