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Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Governor Bill Haslam says he'll stay out of the debate over how much Nashville law enforcement must cooperate with federal immigration authorities, but he doubts the city will have much luck if it hopes to defy President Trump.

The Metro Council is expected to start discussion of some limits later this month. The proposals include requiring federal authorities to present a warrant if they want immigrants to be held longer than U.S.-born arrestees. The ordinance undergoes its first reading — typically a formality — on Tuesday night. 

Haslam says he isn't going to stand in the council's way.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Gov. Bill Haslam does not anticipate much help from President Trump in rebuilding the state's roads and bridges.

The president is expected to announce a new plan this week to upgrade infrastructure around the country, after promising during last year's campaign to spend $1 trillion dollars on transportation improvements. But he appears to want states to partner with private operators on projects like toll roads, and Haslam notes that's something Tennessee has never done to pay for highways.

courtesy Congressman Black via Twitter

Congressman Diane Black.

That's who Tennesseans say they're most familiar with as the race to succeed Governor Bill Haslam begins. Just under half of all voters say in a new statewide poll they've heard of her.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The Republican candidates for governor are saying they'd compel cities in Tennessee to enforce immigration laws if elected.

That comes amid a national debate over whether being picked up for minor offenses should also carry the risk of deportation.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Republicans in Rutherford County gathered Thursday night for their annual Reagan Day dinner.

Such events are primarily fundraisers for the party. But this year, they're also playing an important role in shaping the field to succeed Gov. Bill Haslam.

TN Photo Services (File)

A measure that would make it easier for gun owners and groups like the National Rifle Association to sue cities over gun bans appears to be on its way to becoming Tennessee law.

Governor Bill Haslam says he's still reviewing the legislation, but his recent comments suggest he has no intention of using a veto on it.

TN Photo Services

Gov. Bill Haslam had a pretty good year when it comes to wins and losses in the General Assembly. The Tennessee legislature has — in past years — picked fights with the two-term governor.

WPLN’s Chas Sisk and Jason Moon Wilkins talk about how Haslam’s approach to passing legislation has evolved.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Democrats in Tennessee have been struggling to remain relevant, given their greatly diminished numbers in the state legislature.

WPLN’s statehouse reporter Chas Sisk is with morning host Jason Moon Wilkins to look at how the minority party did in the 2017 session, which concluded this week.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Now that the Tennessee legislature's session has ended, attention is turning to whether Governor Bill Haslam will veto any of the measures passed this year.

Haslam has rejected only four pieces of legislation since taking office in 2011, and it seems doubtful he'll add to that total this year.

TN Photo Services (file)

Randy Boyd says Tennessee should not necessarily be run like a business, despite being a businessman himself. He says he's realized that bureaucracy has some benefits.

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