Politics | Nashville Public Radio

Politics

Political news

TN Secretary of State's office

After more than a decade of planning, the state of Tennessee has started construction on a new Library & Archives building, as officials formally broke ground Monday at the corner of Sixth Avenue North and Jefferson Street.

Bredesen for Senate

Former Gov. Phil Bredesen has officially entered the race for the U.S. Senate, a move that could have ramifications both for Tennessee politics and Democrats' chances nationwide of retaking Congress.

U.S. Dept. of Labor

Conservative activists and lawmakers from across the country will gather in Nashville starting Wednesday for a summit of the American Legislative Exchange Council.

Wikipedia

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says his administration has begun gathering information on a Nashville woman whose murder conviction has become a cause célèbre. But a decision on whether to grant her clemency is unlikely to come until well into next year.

Office of Sen. Bob Corker / via Flickr

Senator Bob Corker said he is "disappointed" to announce he won’t be voting for the current tax overhaul plan.

In a statement released Friday afternoon, the Tennessee Republican said he supports a number of provisions in the legislation and that the tax bill could be fixed to be more fiscally sound and still encourage economic growth.

Clover Bottom closure
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The state's Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities failed to perform background checks on all of its employees and volunteers, and it didn't adequately safeguard the money and possessions of people in its care, according to a new audit by the state comptroller’s office.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

In the rough-hewn parlor of a creaky, 19th-century farmhouse in Brentwood, 13 people are sitting in a pair of concentric circles.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers blasted the state Department of Correction at a meeting on Wednesday, the day after an audit found numerous violations in the state's prisons.

TN Photo Services

The state of Tennessee is asking for $2 million next year to whip the Memphis Regional Megasite into shape, a process that will include hiring an outside consultant to assess why the decade-long project hasn't yet landed a major manufacturer.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Twenty-five more drug agents.

That's what the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is hoping to add in the coming year to aid in efforts to combat the illegal trade in painkillers —  just one of the ways that the opioid epidemic is reshaping state agencies' spending priorities.

Pages