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Nashville Symphony

Emily Siner / WPLN

Players with the Nashville Symphony are giving up their personal instruments for a concert this weekend and instead playing what are called the Violins of Hope — a collection of about two dozen string instruments that were once owned by Jews who survived the Holocaust. 

Bill Steber / Nashville Symphony

A collection of violins once played by Holocaust victims is coming to Music City next year.

Nashville Symphony

The Nashville Symphony has selected a new conductor to handle the orchestra’s community, pops and educational concerts. Enrico Lopez-Yañez has served in a similar role with the Omaha Symphony since 2015.  

image via Nashville Symphony

Giancarlo Guerrero will be taking on a new position in the next concert season. In addition to his role as Music Director of the Nashville Symphony, Guerrero has been named Music Director of the Wrocław Philharmonic in Poland.

NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Space Institute / Wikimedia Commons

Spaceflight was just a theoretical possibility when Gustav Holst wrote his musical exploration of our solar system. 

Steve Hall / courtesy NSO

It's been a trying three years for the Nashville Symphony, which was teetering financially and barely avoided foreclosure on its iconic Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Now, audited financial statements show an organization that is operating in the black.

Wharton Photography / Nashville Symphony

This weekend, the Nashville Symphony celebrates 70 years of existence and a decade in its concert hall. It’s also using the fist concert of this year’s classical series to honor that building’s namesake: Kenneth Schermerhorn.

Nashville Symphony

Giancarlo Guerrero will stay with the Nashville Symphony for nearly another decade, at least. The music director has agreed to a five-year extension of his existing contract.

Nashville Symphony

Correction: A previous version of this story misstated that the symphony's program aims to increase cultural and socioeconomic diversity among musicians. In fact, as stated on its website, the program provides opportunities for ethnically underrepresented musicians, "regardless of financial need."

The Nashville Symphony has received a $959,000 grant to fund its new music education program for underrepresented students.  

Stephanie Richard / via Flickr

The Nashville Symphony is nearly done digging itself out of a giant financial hole. After job cuts, salary reductions and restructuring, the symphony expects to no longer have a budget deficit, starting next year.