Marsha Blackburn | Nashville Public Radio

Marsha Blackburn

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Bob Corker still seems to be on the fence about whether to reverse his decision to retire and get back into the race for Senate.

But in a busy weekend for Republicans across Tennessee, the main contender for the Republican nomination, Congressman Marsha Blackburn, sought to make clear that he'd have to fight her if he hopes to come back.

Bredesen for Senate

Former Gov. Phil Bredesen has officially entered the race for the U.S. Senate, a move that could have ramifications both for Tennessee politics and Democrats' chances nationwide of retaking Congress.

courtesy House Energy and Commerce Committee

Congressman Marsha Blackburn is blaming the Drug Enforcement Administration for not speaking up if legislation she co-sponsored is causing such a problem. An investigation by "60 Minutes" and the Washington Post highlighted her role in a law that made it tougher for the DEA to regulate opioids.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn says the Senate is slowing down President Trump's agenda.

Her remarks come amid an ongoing dispute between Trump and Bob Corker. And while she's declining to call out Tennessee's current senator, she's making it clear she wants them to move on.

Gage Skidmore / via Flickr

Rep. Marsha Blackburn's office is responding, after being named in an investigation by The Washington Post and 60 Minutes for her role in legislation that "aided" in the explosion of the opioid epidemic.

A spokesman suggests the measure may have produced "unintended consequences" that Congress could revisit.

TN Photo Services (file)

Gov. Bill Haslam issued a statement Thursday saying he will not run for U.S. Senate, altering the calculus of the race to replace the retiring Republican Bob Corker and other races down the ballot. So far, two other politicians have announced their decisions later in the day as well.

TN Photo Services (file)

Tennessee’s Republican congressmen all supported the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, which passed the U.S. House Thursday. 

TN Photo Services

Some members of Tennessee’s mostly Republican congressional delegation are showing guarded support for a U.S. military action that consisted of dropping nearly 60 Tomahawk missiles Thursday night, on what was reportedly a Syrian airfield.

The Trump Administration says the strike was a response to this week's chemical weapons attack in Syria, which is presumed to have been perpetrated by the Syrian government, though that has not been officially confirmed.

Blake Farmer / WPLN (File photo)

Updated Friday at 8:00 a.m.:

Rep. David Kustoff of West Tennessee released a statement early Friday signaling his support after reserving judgment on Thursday, saying he wanted to see the final draft.

"Republicans have promised to repeal this disastrous law and provide relief to the American people. Later today, I will vote to do just that."

Reported Earlier:

Rep. Scott DesJarlais got an audience with the president on Thursday as part of the House Freedom Caucus. Within the GOP, the group has voiced some of the loudest opposition to the healthcare plan that could replace Obamacare.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

For the past several weeks, Republicans have been dealing with rambunctious crowds in town halls and in legislative corridors. It’s happening across the nation and in Tennessee.

They’ve sparked a debate: Are these authentic, grassroots protests of President Donald Trump, the Republicans in Congress and those controlling the Tennessee State Capitol? Or are they “Astro-turf” activists who’ve been paid to turn out?

Political reporter Chas Sisk and Jason Moon Wilkins discuss the debate.