immigration | Nashville Public Radio

immigration

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 

Scroll down to read or hear this story in Spanish. Desplácese hacia abajo para leer o escuchar esta historia en español.

A Guatemalan mother separated from her 11-year-old daughter while attempting to cross into the United States to seek asylum in May reunited with her Thursday night at the Nashville International Airport. They were separated for more than six weeks.

Jay Shah / WPLN

 

Scroll down to read or hear this story in Spanish. Desplácese hacia abajo para leer o escuchar esta historia en español.

Over the past several months, the Trump Administration has decided not to renew the Temporary Protected Status program, which allows immigrants from troubled countries to work and live in America.

More than 3,400 TPS recipients from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti are in Tennessee, according to the Center for Migration Studies.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

“You’re animals."

That was the first thing Albertina Contreras says she heard after she set foot on American soil, shortly before she was shackled and her daughter taken away to a detention facility for kids. They were headed for Murfreesboro, but only Contreras made it.

Now, attorneys are trying to reunite the family, in one of the first family separation cases identified in Tennessee. 

Chas Sisk / Nashville Public Radio

Hundreds of protesters came out on Saturday to demonstrate against the Trump administration's immigration policies — despite 90-degree temperatures.

Sara Ernst / WPLN

For some Nashvillians, banal tasks like filing paperwork or reading a prescription are major obstacles to their daily lives.

Adult illiteracy affects one in eight in the city, according to the Nashville Adult Literacy Council, and the problem goes beyond native citizens who didn’t learn during childhood. The NALC says it hits hardest among Nashville’s growing immigrant and refugee populations.

TN Photo Services

Updated at 2:06 p.m.

A measure that would require government agencies and local police in Tennessee to work with federal immigration authorities will become law, despite a vigorous campaign urging Gov. Bill Haslam to veto the measure.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Tennesseans are becoming more open to letting undocumented immigrants stay in the country — even as official federal policy has been moving in the opposite direction.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

During this year's session, the Tennessee legislature passed a bill that seeks to punish "sanctuary cities," but Gov. Bill Haslam has yet to sign it. And some hope this could be the rare time he chooses to veto.

 

He’s facing pressure from those who are opposed to the measure and — from within his own party — by those who have seen anti-immigration issues be effectively used in political campaigns.

In this edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and Chas Sisk sort through why Haslam might just issue a veto.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN


Some educators and advocates are concerned that a new bill aimed at curbing illegal immigration could lead to parents pulling their children out of school. The measure, if signed by the Governor, would require law enforcement to comply with federal immigration authorities, which opponents say could virtually turn officers inside schools into immigration agents.

It was that fear which drove hundreds of people to protest in front of the state Capitol last week, in one of the largest immigration demonstrations in recent years.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 

People living in a small, rural Tennessee town are still trying to navigate the fallout of a major federal immigration raid earlier this month.

Bean Station, in northeast Tennessee, is home to about 3,000 people. The big jobs in town are the meatpacking plants and tomato fields.

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