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History

walking tour Nashville
unitestreettours.com

Before launching her own tour company, Chakita Patterson regularly took walking tours in Nashville and other cities, and noticed a trend: “They only had one ‘black fact.’ ”

Vanderbilt TV News Archive

Belmont University is hosting Davis Cup tennis matches this week, marking the return of one of the sports premier showcases to Nashville for the first time in 40 years. In 1978, professional tennis was more popular and the participants more noteworthy, but it was off-the-court clashes which earned the event international attention.

MLK Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

As the nation looked back on the dark day of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., so too did Nashvillians gather in his honor.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville — like most locales — is losing its accents. Distinctive voices are diffusing in a modern world with mass media and transient lifestyles. But one 93-year-old is keeping the sound of old Nashville alive.

Strong Inside Wallace Maraniss
Courtesy of Andrew Maraniss

A documentary about the Vanderbilt basketball star Perry Wallace, who integrated the Southeastern Conference, debuts Monday evening on campus. But the event has taken on a somber tone because Wallace died on Friday — just as his alma mater was marking the 50th anniversary of the breaking of a stubborn color barrier.

Aja Bain / courtesy Historic Nashville

Usually, the nonprofit called Historic Nashville selects nine sites around the city that it thinks are endangered and should be preserved.

This year, it selected one: Fort Negley.

Oak Ridge Public Library

Seventy-five years ago this week, the federal government quietly took over 60,000 acres nestled in the ridges of East Tennessee. It was the beginning of Oak Ridge: a city cloaked in secrecy that tens of thousands of people flocked to during World War II, most unknowingly helping to build the world's first atomic bomb.

Emily Siner / WPLN

One of the largest collections of books and manuscripts about the history of playing cards is now in the possession of the Vanderbilt library.

The university has purchased more than a thousand pieces of memorabilia that previously belonged to Bicycle Cards, which the library hopes will make Vanderbilt a destination for scholars around the world.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

In a library at Cumberland University, history professor Mark Cheathem flips the switch on an electronic scanner.

The image of a letter addressed to Martin Van Buren, the nation's eighth president, pops up on screen. 

At least, that's what it appears to be.

The handwriting is a loopy scrawl. The language is outdated. Words written on one side of the page have bled through to the other, making the document even harder to read.

courtesy Tennessee Department of Veterans

A former Murfreesboro soldier is coming home. Technical Sergeant William O’Kieff died in a plane crash during the Vietnam War. It would take nearly 50 years for his remains to be identified.

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