Health Care | Nashville Public Radio

Health Care

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AMSF2011 via Flickr

Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander is putting some election-year pressure on Congress to shore up the individual insurance marketplace. As the head of the Senate's health committee, he promised the bi-partisan legislation as a way to mitigate any damage from canceling the individual mandate to buy insurance.

frankieleon via Flickr

After weeks of backroom talks, Tennessee lawmakers have landed on a compromise that could establish some of the toughest rules on opioid prescribing in the country. Legislators acknowledge they're creating headaches in the process, but they say overdose deaths call for drastic action.

Joe Buglewicz / for WPLN

Nashville health officials are trying to decide whether a steep drop in childhood poverty is something to celebrate. County-by-county data published Wednesday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shows a much smaller percentage of children in Davidson County are growing up poor.

Metro General Hospital
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Megan Barry's resignation as Nashville's mayor basically ends months of debate about whether to close General Hospital. David Briley pushed back against the mayor's plans, even before he took over her job.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville police will soon have a place to drop people in a mental health crisis who haven't committed a serious crime. Construction begins this week on the city's first jail diversion program for the mentally ill.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Suicides have been surging in Tennessee, and state health officials don’t know why — in part — because they haven't been studying them closely. The legislature is considering a proposal to review each suicide, case by case.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The push to require Medicaid recipients to get jobs has at least some support from everyone running to be Tennessee governor — even the Democrats.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has been desperate to cut down on the use of powerful pills. So the mammoth agency has taken a sharp turn toward alternative medicine. The thinking goes that even if it doesn’t cure a mental or physical ill, it can't hurt.

Jed Dekalb / courtesy UT System

The University of Tennessee is making opioid research and awareness a system-wide priority. The commitment came during the annual "state of UT" address this week.

counselman collection / via Flickr

For decades, emergency physicians and intensive care doctors instinctively have been reaching for saline when they order intravenous fluids for a patient. Now a pair of two-year studies conducted at Vanderbilt Medical Center finds a slight but meaningful benefit to an alternative fluid. So the hospital is making a wholesale change and encouraging other hospitals to follow suit.

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