health care

Natasha Senjanovic / WPLN

Hundreds of Tennesseans spent Friday night in the Cookeville High School parking lot. They were lined up to get into a free, traveling clinic this weekend, which for some has become a primary source of healthcare.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Some in Tennessee's congressional delegation are reserving full judgment about the new health care plan proposed by House Republicans.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Tennessee's insurance commissioner says she's talking to Humana about maintaining coverage in parts of the state next year, despite the company's announcement Tuesday that it intends to leave the Affordable Care Act insurance exchange nationwide.

Courtesy of Vanderbilt

Call it the Uber of healthcare.

With the touch of a button on a smartphone, people in Davidson County can order a nurse practitioner to come to them within two hours. Some startups have already been experimenting with this model — including one in Nashville — but now Vanderbilt, one of the most prominent hospitals in the region, is joining the competition.

TN Photo Services

Conservatives have pressed for states to be given more control over how federal tax dollars are spent — especially on big programs like Medicaid — with little success in recent years.

But Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is getting excited that a breakthrough may be about to happen, now that Republicans are gaining control of the White House, in addition to Congress.

Screenshot of Healthcare.gov

Today, the rate increases and changes in insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act actually become a reality for consumers. Many Tennesseans are facing two major questions: how much more their new plan will cost, and whether their current doctors will still be covered.

credit Nashville Health Care Council and Don Jones Photography

The Franklin-based hospital giant, Community Health Systems, saw its stock price plummet by 50 percent on Thursday, closing at $5.05 per share. The struggling hospital giant warned investors that its revenue is going to keep dropping.

Brookings Institute

Nashville needs to build better relationships between big health care companies and tech startups if it wants to remain a powerhouse in the health care industry, according to a new report by the Brookings Institute.

Nashville Capital Network and Nashville Health Care Council

There's more venture capital money floating around Nashville, and most of it is still going into the health care business. The city's investors and health care executives have compiled a report that finds in the last 10 years, $1.6 billion has been poured into local startups, 60 percent of that went into health care.

Joe Howell / Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is trying to solve a problem that is currently hindering research: how to get enough participants — especially from minority groups — to take part in clinical trials. 

The National Institutes of Health recently awarded Vanderbilt a $14 million grant to help researchers around the country find more people to study. By some estimates, more than a third of clinical trials have to stop because there aren't enough participants, says Consuelo Wilkins, a joint professor at Vanderbilt and Meharry Medical College.

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