guns | Nashville Public Radio

guns

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers are preparing for another season of debate over gun legislation.

But they're trying to get off on a better foot: by coming together on one measure they can agree on.

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Worries about the safety of children as they travel to and from school has led to two new laws that go into effect Jan. 1 in Tennessee.

But state leaders also fear college students have been overly protected, a situation they've also decided to address with a new law.

They're among the measures that take effect as the calendar turns the page to 2018. Jan. 1 is one of the two dates Tennessee lawmakers typically choose for legislation to take effect.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

Gun owners will be allowed to carry when Tennessee lawmakers move into their new office building this month.

House Speaker Beth Harwell and Senate Speaker Randy McNally announced the decision Wednesday. It will apply to anyone with a permit to carry a handgun.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Midday at the senior center in Dickson, and Police Sergeant David Cole is giving his audience a pep talk.

He admits that seemingly random killings have injected an element of fear into public life. One that could lead people to conclude that they're defenseless any time they gather together.

"And some people would say, 'I can defend against it. I won't go,'" he says, triggering a knowing chuckle from the audience. "Well, if you don't do that, they win. They win."

Chas Sisk / WPLN

As a state lawmaker, Republican Mae Beavers frequently proposed legislation to do away with handgun carry permits. And as a candidate for governor, her position is unchanged.

She believes there are already enough strings attached to gun purchases, so the permit process is pointless.

Courtesy Office of the Mayor

People who work with teenagers don’t understand why gun violence is on the rise again. In less than six months, the number of teen deaths in Nashville has already matched the death toll for all of last year. 

TN Photo Services (File)

A measure that would make it easier for gun owners and groups like the National Rifle Association to sue cities over gun bans appears to be on its way to becoming Tennessee law.

Governor Bill Haslam says he's still reviewing the legislation, but his recent comments suggest he has no intention of using a veto on it.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Now that the Tennessee legislature's session has ended, attention is turning to whether Governor Bill Haslam will veto any of the measures passed this year.

Haslam has rejected only four pieces of legislation since taking office in 2011, and it seems doubtful he'll add to that total this year.

Bill Dunn
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

The Tennessee House has approved a measure that would make it easier — and possibly lucrative — for groups like the National Rifle Association to sue local governments over gun bans.

Supporters hope the proposal will have the effect of toppling some of the few remaining gun-free zones, such as transit stations.

Nashville MTA bus photo
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

A measure that could effectively allow guns on city buses and inside stations is close to passing the Tennessee legislature.

The Senate Finance Committee approved the proposal on Tuesday, sending it to the floor for a final vote within the next few days. The state House of Representatives is scheduled to take the measure up on Wednesday.

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