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Fisk University

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 


Nashville’s Fisk University has joined a national effort to double the number of minorities in leadership positions at art museums. Right now only 16 percent of those jobs are held by minorities.

Emily Siner / WPLN

For such a small school, Fisk University attracts a lot of funding for scientific research.

This is the second year in a row that it's been ranked in the top five liberal arts schools in the country in terms of research dollars, according to Washington Monthly's rankings. It's in part due to the historically black college's efforts to recruit faculty who embrace the school's focus on students but still win big grants.

Ed Rode / Fisk University

Fisk University's new president wants to build more relationships in Nashville.

In a recent interview with WPLN, Kevin Rome said the historically black college has a positive reputation nationally, but locally it's battling its history of unstable leadership and financial troubles. That narrative that has long frustrated university officials, which says they have plenty to be proud of.

Emily Siner / WPLN

An influential — and at times divisive — political figure is speaking at Fisk University on Monday. Nancy Pelosi is giving the annual commencement address and also receiving an honorary doctorate. 

courtesy Fisk University

Kevin Rome will step into the position of Fisk University’s 16th leader on July 1. He is currently president of Lincoln University in Missouri, which like Fisk, is a historically black institution.

In a statement, Rome said those who have held the position before him have left a strong legacy of leadership, upon which he’s ready to build.

Courtesy of Raymond Wade / Fisk University

Fisk University in Nashville is one of the most storied institutions in the country.

It was founded 150 years ago, just after the Civil War, to educate freed slaves. It graduated prominent black leaders of the Harlem Renaissance and Civil Rights. Its Jubilee Singers have been nominated for a Grammy.

But as it wraps up its sesquicentennial anniversary, Fisk is still grappling with a dilemma as old as the school itself: how to become financially sustainable. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

One of the leaders of the Civil Rights movement in Nashville tried to guide the current generation of activists while visiting Fisk University on Thursday. Diane Nash returned to her alma mater to speak to students about organizing nonviolently.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

While Fisk University was fighting a drawn-out legal battle over the fate of a high-profile art collection, it quietly sold two other paintings in the school's archives. That twist in the story was first reported Tuesday in the New York Times.

Carl Van Vechten Gallery
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Fisk University’s famed Alfred Stieglitz Collection has returned to Nashville. After two years hanging in the Crystal Bridges museum in Arkansas, the artwork will get an unveiling here on April 7.