Education

Emily Siner / WPLN

The state has a budget surplus, and government agencies have a lot of ideas of how to spend it. 

During a series of budget hearings this month, they're making their case to the governor about what should be funded next year. And for Tennessee's public higher education systems — which run 50 technical colleges, community colleges and universities — that request includes a big line item: $340 million for capital projects.

Emily Siner / WPLN

As tensions flare over a Trump presidency, schools have become the front lines for some of the confrontations. This leaves administrators having to decide where the line is between expression and harassment. 

EaglebrookSchool / via Flickr Creative Commons

Tennessee's social studies scores from the first year of the TNReady test show just how much harder it is. High school results in all subjects were released Friday with a warning that they represent a "reset moment" for the state.

Tennessee Promise — the statewide program that allows high school graduates to go to community college for free — seems to be boosting the number of students returning for a second year, according to preliminary data. 

The state hasn't yet released official retention numbers from the first class of Tennessee Promise. But a handful of schools in Middle Tennessee are reporting higher retention rates.

TN Photo Services

Tennessee is getting a big pat on the back from the country's top education officials. Science scores are in from the National Assessment of Education Progress, and the state leap-frogged ahead to become "most-improved" since 2011.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Tennessee State University is raising its admissions standards for next fall. The change has two goals, administrators say: limiting the number of students who will likely find college difficult, and attracting more high-performing students who will go on to graduate.

It will still be weeks before scores are released for the few Tennessee students who completed new standardized testing in the spring. But already education officials are warning that the numbers will look bad.

TN Photo Services

Middle Tennessee State University and Tennessee Tech will soon have more control of their respective destinies.

That is the goal, at least, of the state's broader effort to grant independence to Tennessee's public colleges. Gov. Bill Haslam appointed their new governing boards Thursday.

Robert Karma via Flickr

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is starting to announce the new board members of six public universities, marking the next step in a historic power shift in the state's higher education system.

The Bent Tree via Flickr

In the hopes of seeing more students go to college, Tennessee education officials are pushing high school seniors to fill out federal financial aid forms earlier than ever before. 

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