Education | Nashville Public Radio

Education

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Dozens of Nashville-area high school students took time off from their Spring Break to lobby state lawmakers about college tuition.

They hoped to build support for a bill that would grant in-state tuition to undocumented students. 

The group included Adriana Herrera, a senior at Overton High School who was brought to the U.S. as a child. Her father was deported four years ago, leaving her mom as a single parent.

Herrera said she wants to become an attorney and work with juvenile offenders.

Vanderbilt University

New Tennessee crime stats reveal Vanderbilt University had far more reported cases of rape and sexual assault in 2014 than any other school in the state. Administrators believe awareness efforts have caused more victims to come forward in recent years.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

There’s a stack of research that suggests all the educational innovation in the world still doesn’t hold a candle to an awesome teacher. And that's the driving force behind an experiment at three low-performing Nashville schools to broaden the impact and boost the pay of superstar teachers.

TN Photo Services

Tennessee lawmakers appear to be closing in on a plan to address Common Core education standards, but they’re keeping their solution under wraps.

Lawmakers have been trying for weeks to figure out how to deal with Common Core, the controversial education standards they adopted five years ago.

woodleywonderworks / Flickr

Both the state House and Senate began advancing a proposal Wednesday that gives any student with an Individualized Education Plan the option to take the federal, state and local money that would be spent on them and attend a private school or alternative program. They could even be homeschooled and use the money for tutors and special therapy.

Stephen Chin via Flickr

Tennessee lawmakers are working to keep school districts in the business of offering classes online. But as they do so, they’re staying away from the program’s most notable failure.

The state Senate voted Monday to extend the state's virtual school program for four more years, clearing the way for schools in Nashville, Chattanooga and elsewhere in Tennessee to remain open into 2019.

Bill McChesney via Flickr

A plan to start a school voucher program in Tennessee has been kicking around in the legislature for several years. And this may be the session it finally passes, even though Governor Bill Haslam abandoned his own proposal from years past.

Haslam isn’t the biggest fan of paying private school tuition for students, but he does see some potential if a voucher program is limited to low-income families zoned for struggling schools.

vauvau / Flickr

A bill allowing students to opt out of the ACT narrowly failed in the Tennessee House of Representatives on Wednesday. But it started a conversation about those who intentionally bomb the college entrance exam and what the state should do about it.

TN Photo Services

School systems in Memphis, Knoxville and Chattanooga are already pursuing litigation to demand more state funding. But Nashville’s superintendent argues Metro Schools should stay out of court. 

In a letter to school board members, Jesse Register says he sees a legal challenge as a last resort. And with the replacement of lightning rod Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman, Register says now is the time to “work cooperatively.”

University of Tennessee System via Flickr

Some professors at the University of Tennessee are not happy with a recent statement from their president.

While presenting a plan to save costs and increase revenue, Joe DiPietro told the UT board he wanted to review the system’s tenure process, including how it evaluates tenured professors and how it fires the bad ones.

“The reality is, the post-tenure review processes that we currently have is not very effective,” he said.

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