criminal justice | Nashville Public Radio

criminal justice

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A Nashville man facing another decade in prison, a year and a half after his release, may be able to continue his life on the outside.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN


Editor's note: On Friday night, a judge postponed Matthew Charles's hearing. See the update here.

 

Last year, a Nashville man got an unlikely chance at redemption.

Matthew Charles walked out of a federal prison a decade before the end of his term, after the Obama administration reduced the minimum sentence guidelines for dealing crack. He has spent the past year and a half rebuilding his life.

But now in a rare case, a higher court says he needs to go back behind bars.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

A Wilson County man wrongfully convicted of rape and robbery nearly 40 years ago is officially asking the state for $1 million in damages.

The move comes just days after Lawrence McKinney was exonerated by Gov. Bill Haslam.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A group of eight women participated in a special ceremony late last week inside the Tennessee Prison For Women in Nashville. It was their graduation — after most of them spent more than a decade working towards their bachelor’s degrees from Lipscomb University.

Flickr.com/v1ctor

The city’s top prosecutor and top public defender don't agree on what bail reform might look like in Nashville. The two legal officials presented their views at a public forum this week.

Money bail has been a recurring topic for proponents of criminal justice reform who say it keeps poor citizens in jail longer than necessary, and recently some have singled out Davidson County for its bail policies.

Project Return / Facebook Page

Felons find themselves in a precarious position when they walk out of prison — they often have limited work experience, a criminal background and no time for extensive training. Whether they will return to prison — or not — can come down to one big question: Can they find a job?

Tony Gonzalez, WPLN

A Nashville man faces up to five years in prison after pleading guilty to making online threats against law enforcement officers.

 

Robert Ellis Waddey was indicted earlier this year for posting menacing pictures on Instagram. One was of him holding a pistol with a state trooper’s car in the background. Others were of police officers shot and bleeding on the street. Captions included “only a dead cop is a good cop.”

 

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Since 2012, Nashville has spent $547,000 dollars dealing with alleged police misconduct, records show. That includes judgments and settlements. But the District Attorney’s recent take on the fatal shooting of Jocques Clemmons by Metro officer Joshua Lippert could open the department to more lawsuits.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Rutherford County is going to have to stop its policy of arresting and detaining children accused of minor crimes, at least for the time being. A federal judge has granted a preliminary injunction in favor of a lawsuit that claims the county has spent years unlawfully detaining juveniles.   

WPLN

Judge Casey Moreland was arrested at his home this morning after the FBI accused him of trying to "obstruct justice through bribery and witness tampering." A U.S. attorney announced the news at a press conference Tuesday morning. 

The formal complaint filed against Moreland is explicit, detailing allegations that he had sexual relationships with at least two women in what seemed to be an exchange for getting them out of criminal charges and unpaid court fees.

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