Classical Music

image via Nashville Symphony

Giancarlo Guerrero will be taking on a new position in the next concert season. In addition to his role as Music Director of the Nashville Symphony, Guerrero has been named Music Director of the Wrocław Philharmonic in Poland.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

With the Nashville Predators facing off against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Nashville’s first-ever Stanley Cup Final, hockey fever has swept through the city, including its concert halls.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

For the second week in a row, we're featuring talented young musicians. Chloe Harvel recently graduated from high school and is headed off to study violin performance in college. Her 16-year-old brother Nolan plays classical guitar and attends Ravenwood High School. The pair returned to Studio C this week with music that moves a traditional Latin dance into the concert hall. 

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Nashville high schooler Clara Warford has had quite a senior year: the harpist earned a spot in the Carnegie Hall National Youth Orchestra and an acceptance letter from Juilliard. Fresh off her senior recital, Warford brought a selection of music from her recital program to play in Studio C.

Today marks the much-discussed 50th anniversary of the release of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, the Beatles masterpiece considered by some to be the “most important rock & roll album ever made”

Photo Courtesy of The Nashville Symphony

The last time Zuill Bailey played with the Nashville Symphony, he gave a Grammy-winning performance. It’s an experience the virtuoso cellist describes as “capturing lightning in a bottle.”

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week's Live in Studio C featured three Midstate freelance musicians and friends. French horn player Jennifer Kummer and pianist Alessandra Volpi joined clarinetist Emily Bowland on several of her recent recitals to play a trio, which they played in full for us in Studio C.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Since 1868, Americans have set aside time at the end of May to visit the burial sites of veterans. The date of what used to be called "Decoration Day" was chosen for practical reasons: If you're going to place flowers on a grave, what better time than when plenty of flowers are blooming? But it's appropriate timing on a symbolic level, too. The contrast between seasonal beauty and the ugliness of war is an apt metaphor for the bittersweet combination of fond memories and painful loss that lies at the heart of Memorial Day.

It's a complex mix of emotions that music has long explored. Here are a handful of selections that lie in the meeting place between love and loss, war and peace, beauty and discomfort.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Portara Ensemble is ending its season of choral concerts with a program benefiting Nashville's street newspaper, The Contributor. In choosing the music, Director Jason Shelton took inspiration from the poetry that homeless and formerly homeless vendors submit to the paper and the stories of the vendors lives. The concert From Beginning to End: Music of Live, Love and Loss is at 4pm Sunday at Downtown Presbyterian Church, which has long housed The Contributor's vendor office. About 30 members of the choir gathered in Studio C to give us a preview.

You have a few more days to catch “The Dada Effect: An Anti-Aesthetic and Its Influence” at Vanderbilt’s Fine Arts Gallery before it closes on May 27th. The exhibit explores the rise of the artistic movement in the wake of WWI, when Dadaists gathered to forge an anti-establishment, anti-bourgeois and anti-war philosophy that rejected conventions of the past.

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