Civil Rights | Nashville Public Radio

Civil Rights

Jay Shah / WPLN

The city of Nashville recognized Juneteenth, the oldest known U.S. holiday marking the end of slavery, with an inaugural event Tuesday that organizers hope will launch an annual celebration.

Jack Corn / Courtesy of the Frist and The Tennessean

Some of the closest witnesses to the Nashville Civil Rights movement were photographers from the city's two major newspapers at the time, The Tennessean and the Nashville Banner. A selection of their photos — and the Frist Art Museum's latest exhibit that displays them — offer a glimpse into how media outlets chose to cover the events.

walking tour Nashville
unitestreettours.com

Before launching her own tour company, Chakita Patterson regularly took walking tours in Nashville and other cities, and noticed a trend: “They only had one ‘black fact.’ ”

MLK Nashville
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

As the nation looked back on the dark day of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., so too did Nashvillians gather in his honor.

Nashville schools desegregation
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

When Nashville schools began to integrate in 1957, first graders walked through angry white mobs. 

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Rip Patton was arrested in 1961. That's when he and a group of other college students drove from Nashville to Alabama to join the Freedom Rides, where they boarded Greyhound busses and attempted to use white-only lunch counters and bathrooms throughout the South.

YouTube

Worries about the safety of children as they travel to and from school has led to two new laws that go into effect Jan. 1 in Tennessee.

But state leaders also fear college students have been overly protected, a situation they've also decided to address with a new law.

They're among the measures that take effect as the calendar turns the page to 2018. Jan. 1 is one of the two dates Tennessee lawmakers typically choose for legislation to take effect.

Strong Inside Wallace Maraniss
Courtesy of Andrew Maraniss

A documentary about the Vanderbilt basketball star Perry Wallace, who integrated the Southeastern Conference, debuts Monday evening on campus. But the event has taken on a somber tone because Wallace died on Friday — just as his alma mater was marking the 50th anniversary of the breaking of a stubborn color barrier.

Wikipedia

The University of the South in Sewanee is relocating a 77-year-old memorial to a Confederate general, after determining there was little reason for the stone marker to stand at an intersection just off the school's main campus.

Rodney Dunning via Flickr

When members of white nationalist groups declared that they planned to rally in Shelbyville and Murfreesboro at the end of the month, some asked how the cities could allow such a thing.

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