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Emily Siner / WPLN

Tobacco is still the biggest cash crop in many Tennessee fields, as it's been for generations.

But farmers are looking for other options that aren't quite so difficult to grow. And some, like David Fulton in Robertson County, are turning to an unusual crop: indigo — the plant that can be used to dye denim. 

CCA

Nashville-based Corrections Corporation of America is trying to calm investors' nerves after the Justice Department announced it would phase out the use of private prisons.

Company leaders say it'll have less impact on CCA's bottom line than many seem to think. They note that about half of CCA's revenue comes from state and local governments.

Brookings advanced industries growth chart
Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program

Middle Tennessee’s job growth for high-tech manufacturing and other “advanced industries” has accelerated faster than anywhere else in America, according to a new analysis from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program.

Emily Siner / WPLN

An indigo processing company is open for business in Robertson County. It's the first tenant in a building designed to house industrial startups.

In recent months, Stony Creek Colors has been working with local farmers to grow indigo plants, an alternative to tobacco, corn or other big-ticket crops. This building in Springfield is where the company will turn that indigo harvest into blue dye, mostly for denim.

Greg Pye via Flickr

The state's Alcoholic Beverage Commission has released its latest list of grocery stores that will be able to sell wine starting July 1. More than 430 have gotten approved so far.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Wine bottles are already lining the shelves in some Tennessee grocery stores — even though customers can't buy them yet.

July 1 is the first day that supermarkets are allowed to sell wine, and 279 stores in the state have received licenses to sell so far. More — nearly 400 — have gotten approval to start stocking.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Some insurance companies in Tennessee are having to break bad news to their customers: Their rates are about to jump yet again.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

On some weeks, Nashville hotel prices are comparable to New York City — a surprise to travelers and a worry for local tourism promoters. But as the hotel landscape changes, there’s a chance those rates could come down.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The union hall outside the Spring Hill GM plant is busier than it has been in years. On a recent morning, old-timers collect union cards and pass out UAW t-shirts to the newbies who are here as part of their company training.

Emily Siner / WPLN

In Nashville's quest to preserve affordable housing for low-income residents, the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency is trying to convince more landlords to accept Section 8 vouchers. The agency has been holding regular informational meetings in the hopes of reversing a steady decline over the past few years.

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