Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Much of Middle Tennessee had enough snow Tuesday to warrant legitimate sledding. WPLN’s Tony Gonzalez caught up with families in Shelby Park and produced this audio postcard.

Snow has moved out of Middle Tennessee, but single-digit temperatures will turn most of the snow and sleet into ice Tuesday night, especially on the roads. Most school districts in Middle Tennessee have called another snow day but afternoon sunshine kick-started the melting of hillsides and may hinder Wednesday's sledding.

  

#15: The Disrupter

Jan 12, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

More than 50 years ago, Rip Patton's world changed. He started attending nonviolence workshops in Nashville and learned how to endure abuse during the Civil Rights movement without fighting back. Rip became a Freedom Rider, part of the movement that ended an era of legalized segregation in the South.

Now, five decades later, he looks back on his role as a "disrupter" — sitting, standing and singing to make major societal change.

Kesha (Olivia Bee), R.LUM.R (artist), Margo Price (Danielle Holbert), Luke Bryan (artist)

It’s the end of the year and time for critics' picks, best of lists and top 10s — but we’re going to take a slightly different approach and ask a question: What did Nashville sound like in 2017?

Nashville youth poet laureate
YouTube

Harpeth Hall sophomore Haviland Whiting is Nashville’s new youth poet laureate after winning the annual spoken word competition hosted by Southern Word and several Metro agencies, including Mayor Megan Barry's office.

Kaley Cheyenne Fluke

RCA Studio B is no longer the hit factory it was when it opened 60 years ago in Nashville but some modern musicians are still recording there, seeking its signature sound.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

As a palliative care doctor at Alive Hospice, Sasha Bowers has been there at the very end of life for a lot of people. This exposure to the dying has given her a perspective on death that most people don't have, and she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what she's learned.


Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Every weekday morning, public radio listeners across Middle Tennessee tune in to the dulcet voice of WPLN morning host Jason Moon Wilkins. Presumably, when they hear him, most listeners are interested in the news he's sharing and the local stories he's playing. But eventually, one anonymous listener started wondering about Jason Moon Wilkins himself, submitting this Curious Nashville question:

If Jason Moon Wilkins was in a line arranged alphabetically by last name for the rope climb in gym class, is he in the middle or at the end?

Courtesy of Jay Kholos

In 1920, a Jewish family moved from New York to Union City, Tennessee. It was a novel enough occurrence that, nearly a century later, their story has been adapted into a musical, called "Jew Store," which is coming through Nashville this weekend.

And while the name may sound provocative, it also illuminates an often forgotten piece of Southern history.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Odd as it may seem, Gallatin, Tennessee has good reason to embrace a new spray paint mural that features skateboarding. The artwork depicts the late local hero Ray Underhill — who became Tennessee’s first professional skater in the 1980s — and it could be the spark for more street art across the city.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

Talking to college students about death might not seem like the most comfortable conversation, but that is Andrea Mills' job. She teaches a death and dying psychology class at Lipscomb University, where she delves into how people deal with the end of life. She talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what's unique to our culture and time, and what seems to be universal.

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