Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

Joe Nolan

Joe Nolan wrote and read this poem as a radio companion to his new photo essay on Lebanon Pike, part of his ongoing series the Pikes Project

In the poem, we count 12 references to things you can see along the pike. Can you catch them all? 

 

Jason Mrachina via Flickr

The Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville has officially changed its name. While the re-branding is subtle, the museum hopes the shift will bring more visitors inside.

Courtesy of Country Music Association

The Country Music Hall of Fame welcomed three new inductees today, including an artist who some saw as being long overlooked. 

Bluegrass mandolin player Ricky Skaggs and fiddler Johnny Gimble were inducted along with Dottie West — widely considered a country music pioneer. West's fans have clamored for her inclusion in the Hall of Fame for years. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

Players with the Nashville Symphony are giving up their personal instruments for a concert this weekend and instead playing what are called the Violins of Hope — a collection of about two dozen string instruments that were once owned by Jews who survived the Holocaust. 

Rejoice School of Ballet
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

In its latest stage production, a multi-racial youth ballet company in Nashville has decided to tell the story of American slavery and racism.

Courtesy of John Christian Phifer

Funerals can be elaborate and costly, but there's a movement toward simplicity.

This spring, a nonprofit in Sumner County is opening a "green" burial space: 112 acres of bucolic farmland, about 50 miles northeast of Nashville.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Rip Patton was arrested in 1961. That's when he and a group of other college students drove from Nashville to Alabama to join the Freedom Rides, where they boarded Greyhound busses and attempted to use white-only lunch counters and bathrooms throughout the South.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The allegations of sexual misconduct that have ricocheted through Hollywood and other industries have largely missed the Nashville music scene. But in private conversations and online forums, many female songwriters say they've had moments with collaborators that border on harassment and even assault.

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