Arts and Culture | Nashville Public Radio

Arts and Culture

Manuel Cuevas with Johnny Cash
Photo courtesy of Morelia Cuevas via StoryCorps

Nashville tailor Manuel Cuevas, the maker of rhinestone-studded suits worn by entertainers like Elvis Presley and Jack White, is receiving one of the nation's highest honors for folk artists.

The National Endowment for the Arts announced this week that he has won its National Heritage Fellowship, one of only 10 people who'll receive the honor this year.

courtesy Barbershop Harmony Society

The Barbershop Harmony Society is inviting women to be full members of the organization for the first time, effective immediately. The Nashville-based umbrella group says the decision is part of a "new strategic vision" meant to be more inclusive and welcome people of all races, sexual orientations, political opinions and spiritual beliefs.

Every human is fortunate enough to have this organ inside our skull called the brain. It allows us to breathe, create art, develop new technology — and yet, it's still largely a mystery how these masses of neurons translate into thought.

Keturah Davis / Courtesy of Joshua Bishop

In 1964, a Japanese country singer named Tomi Fujiyama performed on the Grand Ole Opry, right after Johnny Cash. She had no idea that someday there would be a movie about her life and her quest to get back on the Opry stage — or how long it would take to get there.

This weekend, Fujiyama is back in Nashville to celebrate the official release of that film.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Being single these days almost always comes with a certain rite of passage: the moment when you download the dating apps.

Programs like Tinder or Bumble have made meeting people much easier (at least in theory), but as Nashville writer Alex Pollack explains, it also makes dating more invasive. He talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our live series Movers & Thinkers about why the apps feel impersonal, yet impossible to break away from.


Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

When people fall in love, something happens in the brain. A chemical reaction that makes us feel tingly and excited. This is the kind of thing that fascinates Jeannie Ingram. She's a relationship therapist in Nashville, and she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers, about what happens when those chemicals start to wear off.

Courtesy of the Tennessee Radio Hall of Fame

Lin Folk, a former WPLN contributor who recently joined the Tennessee Radio Hall of Fame, died last week at 101.

Senate.gov

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee heard comments on a significant piece of music legislation Tuesday that many in the industry thought would never make it this far. The legislation is a collection of bills, including multiple elements of music copyright reform, that lawmakers say would result in more income for copyright owners.

Jack Corn / Courtesy of the Frist and The Tennessean

Some of the closest witnesses to the Nashville Civil Rights movement were photographers from the city's two major newspapers at the time, The Tennessean and the Nashville Banner. A selection of their photos — and the Frist Art Museum's latest exhibit that displays them — offer a glimpse into how media outlets chose to cover the events.

Courtesy of Vanderbilt University

The former Vanderbilt football player most likely to be taken early in this year’s NFL Draft was a campus leader, actively involved in social issues. In the past, that might have been seen as a positive by prospective NFL teams, but Oren Burks has found this year is different.

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