The World

Weekdays 2-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Marco Werman

Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is. The World is heard on over 300 stations across North America.

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Feisal Omar/Reuters 

It hasn't happened since the infamous Black Hawk Down battle in 1993. 

Last month, a US soldier was shot and killed fighting in Somalia. Reports indicate the Navy SEAL was serving alongside his Somali counterparts — not advising from the operating base — as they battled al-Shabab militants.

New York Times correspondent Jeffrey Gettleman has covered Somalia for more than a decade, and writes about it in his new memoir, “Love, Africa.”

Monday’s bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester was, sadly, not a new experience for the UK city.

 

Manchester has been the target of various bombings since the 1970s. But perhaps the most infamous occurred in June 1996, when a 3,300-pound bomb was detonated in the center of the city. The attack was carried out by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA), and left about 200 people injured.

The world is importing labor more than ever before. According to the UN, more than 244 million people globally have left their home countries in search of opportunities.

For women, that often means jobs in child care and the service industry. But what they sign up for is often not what they get.

Candidate Donald Trump called NATO “obsolete,” demanded allies step up their defense spending and threatened to back out of the alliance.

President Trump has since walked back his remarks. He’s meeting with NATO leaders for the first time in Brussels on Thursday, and some member countries are still bracing for another unexpected pivot from a man who’s become known for his impulsive comments and decision-making.

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Neil Hall

Britain has raised its official terror threat level to "critical," the highest possible level used for occasions when an "imminent attack" is possible. 

In addition, hundreds of troops have been deployed to guard key landmarks and possible targets, including Downing Street and Parliament, in order to reduce pressure on the police. 

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Parth Sanyal/Reuters

The numbers are depressing: Every 8 minutes a girl goes missing in India. Most of these girls are trafficked for sex, beggary or domestic labor.

Unofficial counts put the number of victims of sex trafficking in India at 16 million — not counting the girls from neighboring Nepal and Bangladesh who end up here. Mumbai, where I live, is the second-most frequent destination for these girls.

There are two conflicting narratives emerging from the Philippines, where ISIS-style black flags now wave over parts of a provincial capital.

One is that ISIS has totally overrun Marawi, a city roughly the size of Akron, Ohio — a stunning victory for insurgents hell-bent on establishing the caliphate’s Asian outpost.

The other story, propagated by the Philippine military, is that “the armed men we are dealing with are not ISIS” but rather “a local terrorist group.”

Sister Rosemary is a one-woman army in the fight against trafficking

May 24, 2017
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Edward Echwalu

When Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe was first assigned to be director of Saint Monica’s Girls' Vocational School in 2002, a Catholic mission in the northern Ugandan city of Gulu, she was a little worried. She was supposed to teach tailoring to 300 girls and, frankly, she didn’t know the first thing about sewing. When she got there, she found that sewing was the least of her concerns.

How to talk to your kids about terrorism

May 24, 2017

As a parent, I can’t begin to imagine the fear, sorrow and nerve-racking anguish families felt during the Manchester attack. It is gut-wrenching to know that parents of children in civil-war-torn Syria face similar horrors, as do the families of ISIS victims in many Muslim-majority nations. No matter where, violence is unconscionable, unjustifiable and makes no sense. For parents, the loss of a child has to be the hardest of trials.

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

As he concluded his visit to the Middle East on Tuesday, US President Donald Trump championed the Gulf states and pitted himself as the world’s chief antagonist against Shiite Iran and its proxies, ISIS, Hezbollah and Hamas.

The Israeli diplomats and officials invited to hear the speech live in Jerusalem were delighted, rewarding Trump's remarks at the Israel Museum with frequent applause and numerous standing ovations.

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