Marketplace | Nashville Public Radio

Marketplace

Weekdays at 6pm on 90.3 WPLN-FM, Weekdays at 5pm on 1430 WPLN-AM
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace is an in-depth program that focuses on everything from the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

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01/19/2018: Shutdown countdown

6 hours ago

As we tape this, the United States government is hours away from grinding to a halt, barring a last-minute deal. The blame game is already starting, and that's where we'll start today's show. Then we'll look at lessons federal workers learned from the last shutdown. Plus, the latest on Amazon Prime, IBM and electric vehicle sales.

You can’t live in Lawrence Park, Pennsylvania, and not know General Electric. The company designed and built the entire community — the street grid, the houses — over a century ago.

Jim Connelly spent his childhood in the shadow of GE’s 350-acre facility near Erie. And eight years ago, after college and the military, he came home to Lawrence Park and joined the ranks.  

“I really admired that factory when I was growing up, wondering what they did inside the fence,” he said.

A 4 percent revenue hike is not big news for many companies. But for century-plus firm IBM it’s the first in half a decade, and could signal that its focus on cloud computing is paying off.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Amazon is raising its monthly Prime membership rate, from $10.99 to $12.99. But the annual membership cost is staying the same, at $99. So what’s the logic here? Is Amazon trying to push more people into becoming annual members? Might the price hike prompt some people to drop the service altogether? What are the pros and cons of this strategy?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Garbage won't pile up during this government shutdown

9 hours ago

During the last government shutdown, in 2013, garbage piled up in parts of Washington, D.C. The city’s budget was frozen because it was tied to the federal government. Washington was only able to function by dipping into its emergency reserves. It won’t be doing that again.

“We have an exemption for our local funds during the shutdown," said Jenny Reed, director of D.C.’s Office of Budget and Performance Management.

President Donald Trump stood in front of two piles of paper last month. One was the current Code of Federal Regulations, he said; the other was the code back in 1960. Using a pair of golden scissors, Trump cut a piece of “red tape” connecting them.

01/19/2018: One year of President Trump

11 hours ago

On the verge of a government shutdown, we ask: What happens to federal contractors in the event of a government shutdown? And how would bond markets react? Also on the show this week, three mayors from very different cities reflect on what's changed during the first year of the Trump presidency. Plus, a conversation about regulations, a look at smart flu tracking and an examination of dual-enrollment education. 

01/19/2018: All about bonds

12 hours ago

(Markets Edition) A lack of enthusiasm for older, lower interest rates is pushing bond yields up to their highest point in years. Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, joined us to give us some perspective on what's happening. Next, we're looking at another type of bond: the one you pay to get out of jail. One group is seeking to bond 160,000 out of jail in dozens of U.S. cities over the next several years. 

How the potential government shutdown could affect you

13 hours ago

The House of Representatives has passed a bill to temporarily keep the government funded. But to keep it from shutting down just after midnight tonight, the Senate would have to pass its funding extension and, as you've been hearing, the votes may not be there.

One key issue they're fighting over is DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Democrats want protections for people who arrived in the U.S. as undocumented immigrant children.

New figures show Venezuela’s oil output plummeted again last year, continuing a years-long streak of falling production. What will it mean for the economy as inflation soars and quality of life for residents declines? Rice University’s Francisco Monaldi explains why he calls the trend a “death spiral” for the country’s oil industry.

Click the above audio player to hear the full interview.

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