Tony Gonzalez | Nashville Public Radio

Tony Gonzalez

Enterprise Reporter

Tony Gonzalez, a reporter in Nashville since July 2011, covers city news, features inspiring people, and seeks out offbeat stories. He’s also an award-winning juggler and hot chicken advocate who lives in East Nashville with his wife, a professional bookbinder. During his time at The Tennessean newspaper, his investigative reporting and feature stories were honored in the state and nationally. Gonzalez grew up near Chicago and came to Nashville after three years reporting and editing at Virginia's smallest daily newspaper, The News Virginian.

MTA bus Music City Central
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Following closely after the defeat of the multi-billion dollar transit referendum, renovation work will begin on Nashville’s main downtown bus terminal, Music City Central. The $6 million project was already planned, and some consider it overdue.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

There's a persistent disagreement between Nashville Mayor David Briley and Director of Schools Shawn Joseph: The mayor did not include the full funding request from the schools in his proposed budget, and recently issued statements from the two leaders show they're at odds.

David Briley
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Facing budget challenges and the recent division over mass transit, Nashville Mayor David Briley delivered a somber “State of Metro” speech on Friday.

transit vote
NoTaxForTracks.com

Whether for or against Nashville’s failed multi-billion-dollar mass transit plan, the question for Nashville residents has become: What led to such a lopsided vote?

Emily Siner / WPLN

The field of Nashville mayoral candidates is thick: Thirteen people have filed the necessary paperwork to run for Nashville's top office.

They veer from the unorthodox  — a master barber, a former limo driver — to the more traditional lawyers and politicians.

More: WPLN's Complete Coverage Of The 2018 Mayoral Election

To familiarize voters with the menagerie of contenders, WPLN put together a quick and dirty cheat sheet. Who are these people? What are their big ideas?

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Nashville voters resoundingly rejected the multi-billion-dollar transit proposal Tuesday — telling officials to find another way to respond to the city’s growth and traffic congestion.

In the end, it wasn't even close. Some 64 percent of Nashville voters went against the plan. That's in an election that drew a surprising turnout of more than 120,000 people.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN


Now that it's decided that Nashville won't expand its transit system, the head of the MTA says his team must continue looking for other ways to improve.

 

Steve Bland expects to analyze the election results and come back to voters again. Bland says he's "absolutely certain" that traffic congestion is getting worse, so whatever proposal comes next will likely have the attention of even more Nashvillians.

polling place
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Phone calls, mailers, text messages, door knocking and a crush of TV ads have blanketed Nashvillians in the final days before the city’s vote on a multi-billion-dollar mass transit proposal.

The ground game has intensified — and diversified — in the final hours, and a few last public endorsements, for and against, have come in.

bus rendering
MTA

One of the lingering disagreements over Nashville’s transit proposal is how it would impact development along proposed light rail and rapid bus corridors — and if it would intensify the gentrification already happening.

courtesy MTA

Still undecided on Nashville’s transit plan? Planning to spend the weekend studying up before Election Day on Tuesday? Your questions have informed much of WPLN’s coverage —  wpln.org/transit — and a final set of answers to your submitted questions follows below.

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