Nina Cardona | Nashville Public Radio

Nina Cardona

Music Director / Host

Nina Cardona holds a degree in music history from Converse College. Just two days after graduation, she started playing classical music as a part-time host on Nashville Public Radio.  She was WPLN’s All Things Considered host for eleven years, during which time her reporting focused on arts and culture stories.

Nina is a classically trained singer and open water swimmer who dabbles in photography and a variety of needle crafts.

 

Ways to Connect

Linda Compton via Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee

Before the Stonewall Riots, before America's first gay pride parade, Middle Tennessee's LGBT community was very quiet, but it was there.

Nina Cardona / WPLN

Nashville’s Music Row has been officially declared a National Treasure.  That means local groups trying to preserve the character of country music’s home neighborhood will have hands-on assistance from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

  The Trust helps local groups organize, plan and raise money. In some cases, it spearheads legal battles.  This year, it successfully lobbied Congress to add Oak Ridge and the other Manhattan Project sites to the National Parks system. It took the Army Corps of Engineers to court—and won—over a cruise ship port in Charleston’s historic district.

Anne Swoboda via Flickr

Little Jimmy Dickens’ hat, boots and guitar held center stage of the Grand Ole Opry Thursday as the country music community said a final goodbye to one of their mainstays.

The 4 foot 11 singer was known for his joke telling and novelty songs, but speakers like  Vince Gill remembered his kindness and longevity. “If only the good die young,” Gill said, “the greatest of all live to be 94 and sing two weeks before they pass on. And that’s pretty remarkable.”

Dickens was the last remaining Opry member to have performed with Uncle Dave Macon. Singer Connie Smith remembered him as always being quick to welcome new musicians to the fold. Calling Dickens “the heart of the Grand Ole Opry,” Smith said “I watched him so many times stand at the side of this Opry stage and assess everything. He was there to support and to love.”

National Archives and Records Administration

On January 8, 1815, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson lead a ragtag group of American soldiers to an unlikely victory in the Battle of New Orleans. Nobody could have known it at the time, but that win propelled Jackson to become the first self-made man in the White House and helped him change the nature of presidential campaigns.

  Jackson was a country boy who grew up poor and fatherless. His mother died during the Revolutionary War, around the same time he was a teenaged prisoner of war. By the time the War of 1812 broke out, he’d managed to become a wealthy frontier lawyer in a brand-new Nashville. He’d even served a brief term as Tennessee’s first Congressman. But even as an officer, Andrew Jackson was still just a militia volunteer, not a member of the regular army.

The Hermitage

Of all the tokens of appreciation governments sent him after the Battle of New Orleans, a small gold box, about the size of a deck of cards, was one of only five Jackson mentioned in his will. The snuff box was recently returned to Jackson’s home, but for years, it seemed the box might never leave the Hermitage at all.

The engraved box was a high honor bestowed on Jackson by the City of New York. It named him one of the nation’s greatest heroes.

It came with the freedom of the city, which was basically kind of making him a temporary citizen.

The Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History

A team of historians and scientists from Middle Tennessee hope to soon welcome home the remains of soldiers who died on foreign soil nearly 170 years ago.

Construction workers in Monterrey, Mexico unearthed the bones of more than a dozen men several years ago: US soldiers who died in in the Mexican-American war. Because of their location, where the 1st Tennessee Regiment fought and later set up camp in the 1846 Battle of Monterrey, historian Tim Johnson believes it’s likely they were volunteers from the midstate.

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