Nina Cardona | Nashville Public Radio

Nina Cardona

Music Director / Host

Nina Cardona holds a degree in music history from Converse College. Just two days after graduation, she started playing classical music as a part-time host on Nashville Public Radio.  She was WPLN’s All Things Considered host for eleven years, during which time her reporting focused on arts and culture stories.

Nina is a classically trained singer and open water swimmer who dabbles in photography and a variety of needle crafts.

 

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Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Clarinetist Seunghee Lee is currently preparing for her Carnegie Hall debut and short performance tour of Italy, but Murfreesboro audiences get to enjoy her first. Lee is in town to visit and play with her former classmate and fellow clarinetist Todd Waldecker, who teaches at Middle Tennessee State University. The pair were joined in Studio C by another MTSU faculty member, pianist Eunbyol Ko.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Technically, John Johns is retired. He doesn't teach at Blair School of Music anymore. However, to hear him tell it Johns is playing the guitar more than ever. Now that his time is his own, he's spending it on fine tuning the small details of long-favorite pieces, some of which he shared during this performance.

photo courtesy of Tracy Silverman

Take one part violin (no, make that electric violin) concerto, one part narrative story about the life cycle of an insect, combine liberally with film projections ... that’s essentially the recipe for "Love Song to the Sun." The collaboration between Nashville violinist and composer Tracy Silverman and video artist Todd Winkler will have its regional premiere Thursday, Oct. 5 at OZ Arts Nashville, performed by Silverman with the Vanderbilt University Orchestra.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Cellist Michael Samis and pianist Megan Gale returned to Studio C with music by a pair of beloved 19th century masters. For our show, they played selections. They'll perform the pieces in full at a recital on October 20 at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Since moving to Nashville three years ago, composer Cristina Spinei has been busy writing for Nashville musicians. On this show, we hear her at the piano with cellist Cremaine Booker as they play music written for him to post on Instagram, a composition she created for the Nashville Ballet and music that was written as a wedding present. 

George Barnard / Wikimedia Commons

Editor's note: This story was originally published in 2012 for the 150th anniversary of Fort Negley's origin.

Nashville’s Fort Negley was built for war, and construction began in 1862. Union officers considered the stone fortress a show of strength and military might. Instead, the fort’s enduring story belongs to the black laborers, both slave and free, who were forced to build it.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Representatives from Music City's classical community will come together this afternoon for the official proclamation of "Classical Music Day" in Nashville. The ceremony begins at 1:00 on the steps of the Schermerhorn Symphony Center and will, of course, include a live performance.  We're kicking off our celebration on the air in the morning, with recordings of Midstate musicians scheduled throughout the day.

As always, you can listen to 91Classical on the radio at 91.1FM, with the Nashville Public Radio app or by streaming audio on this website.

For this week's show, trumpeter Joel Treybig assembled an ensemble to perform a pair of chamber selections from the Baroque era. Treybig is on the faculty at Belmont University School of Music. His colleagues for this performance are oboists Robert Shankle and Grace Woodworth, bassoonist Dong-yun Shankle and harpsichordist Andrew Risinger.

Rebecca Bauer / Gateway Chamber Orchestra

School is in session, we've felt the first hints of autumn's chill in the air — it's the time when new performance seasons traditionally begin. While Middle Tennessee’s professional ensembles and venues don’t all hold to that calendar, now’s still a good time to look at what some of them have in store for the city’s audiences.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

In between the hourly live performances, 91Classical Radio Fest is celebrating the music that means a lot to our listeners. We asked our audience to call in and tell us about particular pieces that are special — and why. We've also been interviewing people in our community on that topic for a podcast that's currently in development. Throughout the day, we'll be sharing the comments we received and playing the music that inspired them.

Airing in the 9:00 hour:

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