Nina Cardona

Music Director / Host

Nina Cardona holds a degree in music history from Converse College. Just two days after graduation, she started playing classical music as a part-time host on Nashville Public Radio.  She was WPLN’s All Things Considered host for eleven years, during which time her reporting focused on arts and culture stories.

Nina is a classically trained singer and open water swimmer who dabbles in photography and a variety of needle crafts.

 

Ways to Connect

George Barnard / Wikimedia Commons

Editor's note: This story was originally published in 2012 for the 150th anniversary of Fort Negley's origin.

Nashville’s Fort Negley was built for war, and construction began in 1862. Union officers considered the stone fortress a show of strength and military might. Instead, the fort’s enduring story belongs to the black laborers, both slave and free, who were forced to build it.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Representatives from Music City's classical community will come together this afternoon for the official proclamation of "Classical Music Day" in Nashville. The ceremony begins at 1:00 on the steps of the Schermerhorn Symphony Center and will, of course, include a live performance.  We're kicking off our celebration on the air in the morning, with recordings of Midstate musicians scheduled throughout the day.

As always, you can listen to 91Classical on the radio at 91.1FM, with the Nashville Public Radio app or by streaming audio on this website.

For this week's show, trumpeter Joel Treybig assembled an ensemble to perform a pair of chamber selections from the Baroque era. Treybig is on the faculty at Belmont University School of Music. His colleagues for this performance are oboists Robert Shankle and Grace Woodworth, bassoonist Dong-yun Shankle and harpsichordist Andrew Risinger.

Rebecca Bauer / Gateway Chamber Orchestra

School is in session, we've felt the first hints of autumn's chill in the air — it's the time when new performance seasons traditionally begin. While Middle Tennessee’s professional ensembles and venues don’t all hold to that calendar, now’s still a good time to look at what some of them have in store for the city’s audiences.

Kara McLeland / Nashville Public Radio

In between the hourly live performances, 91Classical Radio Fest is celebrating the music that means a lot to our listeners. We asked our audience to call in and tell us about particular pieces that are special — and why. We've also been interviewing people in our community on that topic for a podcast that's currently in development. Throughout the day, we'll be sharing the comments we received and playing the music that inspired them.

Airing in the 9:00 hour:

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Nashville Public Radio's first-ever broadcast-only music festival is highlighting Nashville's classical music-makers all day today. Tune in for live performances at the start of every hour, and keep listening between those sets to hear recordings by talented Midstate soloists and ensembles. Here's a rundown of who you can expect to hear today in Studio C:

In the 9:00 hour:

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

The Kruger Brothers are an ensemble from two continents (brothers Jens and Uwe Kruger are Swiss, their partner Joel Landsberg is from New York) and their music for banjo, guitar and bass draws from musical traditions on both sides of the Atlantic. For this performance in Studio C, they brought a collection of pieces that meld bluegrass and classical sounds, some of which were written to be performed with string quartet.

Wikimedia Commons

As 91Classical, Nashville Public Radio's classical music service is adding several regular programming elements to each weekday's playlists.

After more than a year of quiet changes, Nashville Public Radio's classical service is now 91Classical.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Every summer, the singers of I Madrigali gather under the direction of John Perry to form a seasonal choir, culminating in preshow performances at the Nashville Shakespeare Festival's Shakespeare in the Park. They brought a sampler of Renaissance madrigals for their performance in Studio C.

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