Nina Cardona

Music Director / Host

Nina Cardona holds a degree in music history from Converse College. Just two days after graduation, she started playing classical music as a part-time host on Nashville Public Radio.  She was WPLN’s All Things Considered host for eleven years, during which time her reporting focused on arts and culture stories.

Nina is a classically trained singer and open water swimmer who dabbles in photography and a variety of needle crafts.

 

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Nashville Symphony

The Nashville Symphony has selected a new conductor to handle the orchestra’s community, pops and educational concerts. Enrico Lopez-Yañez has served in a similar role with the Omaha Symphony since 2015.  

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Cellist Nicholas Gold put his own spin on 19th century music during this week's Live in Studio C. First, he and Brian Eades followed the tradition of violin virtuoso Paganini as they improvised additions to a set of variations. Then fellow cellist Elizabeth Browne filled in for the orchestra in a reduction of music by Schumann.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Two weeks ago, we heard performances by faculty teaching music students at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts. On this program, we get a taste of the talented high school juniors and seniors who have come from all over the state. 

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week, a versatile young harpist from Wales stopped by Studio C on his way between a festival in New Orleans and a workshop in Louisville. At just 21, it would be impressive enough if Ben Creighton Griffiths only held the principal harp position for one professional orchestra, but he's got that job with two ensembles, plus parallel careers as a touring soloist in both the classical and jazz genres. Griffiths gave us a taste of the wide range of music he can tease out of a single instrument, from impressionistic classical and traditional Welsh to walking bass and modal jazz.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Each summer, talented high school students from around the state gather in Murfreesboro to hone their visual art, theater, dance or music skills with college-level teachers at the Governor's School for the Arts. We got a taste of how much fun the faculty get to have, as professors from the music division performed lively selections together with their peers.

image via Nashville Symphony

Giancarlo Guerrero will be taking on a new position in the next concert season. In addition to his role as Music Director of the Nashville Symphony, Guerrero has been named Music Director of the Wrocław Philharmonic in Poland.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

For the second week in a row, we're featuring talented young musicians. Chloe Harvel recently graduated from high school and is headed off to study violin performance in college. Her 16-year-old brother Nolan plays classical guitar and attends Ravenwood High School. The pair returned to Studio C this week with music that moves a traditional Latin dance into the concert hall. 

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

This week's Live in Studio C featured three Midstate freelance musicians and friends. French horn player Jennifer Kummer and pianist Alessandra Volpi joined clarinetist Emily Bowland on several of her recent recitals to play a trio, which they played in full for us in Studio C.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Since 1868, Americans have set aside time at the end of May to visit the burial sites of veterans. The date of what used to be called "Decoration Day" was chosen for practical reasons: If you're going to place flowers on a grave, what better time than when plenty of flowers are blooming? But it's appropriate timing on a symbolic level, too. The contrast between seasonal beauty and the ugliness of war is an apt metaphor for the bittersweet combination of fond memories and painful loss that lies at the heart of Memorial Day.

It's a complex mix of emotions that music has long explored. Here are a handful of selections that lie in the meeting place between love and loss, war and peace, beauty and discomfort.

Nina Cardona / Nashville Public Radio

Portara Ensemble is ending its season of choral concerts with a program benefiting Nashville's street newspaper, The Contributor. In choosing the music, Director Jason Shelton took inspiration from the poetry that homeless and formerly homeless vendors submit to the paper and the stories of the vendors lives. The concert From Beginning to End: Music of Live, Love and Loss is at 4pm Sunday at Downtown Presbyterian Church, which has long housed The Contributor's vendor office. About 30 members of the choir gathered in Studio C to give us a preview.

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