Meribah Knight | Nashville Public Radio

Meribah Knight

Reporter

Meribah Knight is a journalist who recently relocated to Nashville from Chicago, where she covered business, the economy, housing, crime and transportation.

Most recently she was a staff reporter with Crain’s Chicago Business covering manufacturing in the Rust Belt, aviation and transportation. Prior to Crain’s she was a staff reporter with the Chicago News Cooperative, producing the Chicago section of The New York Times. There she covered a wide range of topics from arts & culture to education to poverty. She was an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. 

Her writing has appeared The New York TimesThe New YorkerO, The Oprah MagazineUtne Reader, American Craft, Chicago Magazine, Crain’s Chicago Business and The Chicago Reader. Her radio and multimedia work has been featured on WBEZ, The PBS News Hour and Chicago Public Television. 

A native of Cambridge, Mass., Meribah has a Masters of Journalism from Northwestern University and a BA from New York University. She lives in Donelson with her husband, a photojournalist with the Tennessean, and their four cats. 

Ways to Connect

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The proposal to create a police community oversight board in Nashville is teetering on the edge of failure. The legislation has been in the works for months, but recently it's been mired in legal concerns. And Tuesday's Metro Council meeting will decide its fate. 

Meribah Knight / WPLN

It all began with an email.

The subject: Dead Bird at the Legal Department Steps.

The culprit was unknown, but it was likely Lizzie, Darcy or Tux, three cats who hang around the Metropolitan Development Housing Agency's administration buildings in the James Cayce homes. They're fed by staff. They've even been fixed and vaccinated.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

A couple years back Tiffany Hancock, a devoted vegan, had a crisis of conviction. It was over a doughnut.  

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Nashville saw a rise in homicides across the city this year — but some neighborhoods were worse than others. In and around the James Cayce Homes in East Nashville, there were seven murders, the most in 26 years. 

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

2018 is going to be a big year for public housing. Nashville will be renovating, or planning renovations, for four public housing developments — The James Cayce homes in East Nashville, the Edgehill Homes in South Nashville and the JC Napier and Sudekum apartments, just south of downtown. All together they're home to about 5,000 people. 

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville is creating the city's first community land trust, the Mayor's office announced Tuesday. The trust will buy up property, maintain partial ownership and keep it affordable for generations of owners.

AMSF2011/Flickr

Sen. Bob Corker just came out in support of the GOP tax bill. Initially he was worried about its impact on the federal deficit. But fellow Tennessee Republican, Sen. Lamar Alexander, who peddled the plan Friday morning at the Rotary Club of Brentwood, says he thinks the plan will help the nation's debt.

MDHA

The Metro Housing Board moved ahead on a plan to pay for the construction of a $25-million-dollar East Nashville charter school. It's an unprecedented financing move that opens up the agency to risk by acting as both the developer and the lender for the project.

Flickr

Home prices in Nashville may be leveling out in 2018. A forecast by Realtor.com says that's because the number of homes for sale in the area is increasing.

Courtesy of MDHA

Nashville's housing authority took a major step toward creating the city's new vision of public housing, which hopes to break up blocks of concentrated poverty with varying levels of income. Metro broke ground Wednesday on a new mixed-income building in East Nashville's James Cayce Homes. Called Kirkpatrick Park, it will be the first of its kind in the neighborhood.

Pages