Meribah Knight

Reporter

Meribah Knight is a journalist who recently relocated to Nashville from Chicago, where she covered business, the economy, housing, crime and transportation.

Most recently she was a staff reporter with Crain’s Chicago Business covering manufacturing in the Rust Belt, aviation and transportation. Prior to Crain’s she was a staff reporter with the Chicago News Cooperative, producing the Chicago section of The New York Times. There she covered a wide range of topics from arts & culture to education to poverty. She was an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. 

Her writing has appeared The New York TimesThe New YorkerO, The Oprah MagazineUtne Reader, American Craft, Chicago Magazine, Crain’s Chicago Business and The Chicago Reader. Her radio and multimedia work has been featured on WBEZ, The PBS News Hour and Chicago Public Television. 

A native of Cambridge, Mass., Meribah has a Masters of Journalism from Northwestern University and a BA from New York University. She lives in Donelson with her husband, a photojournalist with the Tennessean, and their four cats. 

Ways to Connect

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Rodney Northington is an unlikely person to be telling folks who live in the James Cayce housing projects to put down their guns. He’s a convicted felon, a former drug dealer and at one-time a high-ranking gang member. But he’s also, quite possibly, the perfect man for the job.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville’s Police Department wants to bring back the neighborhood cop—on foot. It’s not an obvious choice for a sprawling city like Nashville. But it’s one that aims to put the community back into policing.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

The McFerrin Park Community Center is still patched with plywood after bullets shattered the front doors and various windows. A week ago, two teens were shot and injured outside the center when a group of masked men drove up, aimed, and fired a flurry of bullets toward the front door, forcing the kids inside to run for cover. The police say they have not yet apprehended the suspects.

It’s going to cost significantly more than expected to outfit the Metro Police Department with body cameras. But Chief Steve Anderson says the hefty price tag is the cost of transparency.

Anderson says it’s the most expensive request he’s ever made: $50 million to deploy body cameras to the force’s 1400 officers and their vehicles. And the hardware is just a fraction of that. There’s storage, software, infrastructure, a back-up system. He’s requesting money to hire another two dozen officers just to handle the deluge of footage.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The Nashville police department is getting rid of a 31-year-old, racially charged textbook that is issued to every academy recruit.

The decision comes after WPLN pressed the police department on its use of Tactical Edge, a book covering high risk patrol, in a story that aired Monday.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

On the first day of training, every new recruit in the Nashville Police Academy is issued a stack of reading materials. Right on the top is Tactical Edge, a textbook dedicated to high risk patrol.

The dedication page reads: “For those officers who want to win.” The book, written by former journalist Charles Remsberg, was published in 1986. With gritty black and white photographs and tabloid-esque writing, it depicts a world of constant and increased threat. And it prescribes an aggressive approach to policing at a time when Nashville's department, and many around the country, are trying to move the other way.

Courtesy of the Metro Nashville Police Department

After last month’s fatal police shooting, there’s been a groundswell of demand to equip Nashville police with body cameras. But the implementation is tricky. How is the footage stored, and for how long?

Bill Haslam / Flickr

When the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation started looking into the recent shooting death of Jocques Clemmons by a Metro police officer, it added yet another investigation to its surging caseload. It also highlighted the state agency’s increasing role in scrutinizing local police.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

When a developer bought a large affordable housing complex in Nashville’s Edgehill neighborhood, residents worried they might lose their homes. And they had good reason. Across the city, developers are buying up buildings, remodeling them and raising the rents.

But before that could happen, these residents banded together, formed a tenants’ union and asked the buyer to talk. And much to their surprise, the new owner agreed.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

When the police department released footage of Officer Joshua Lippert shooting Jocques Clemmons after he ran a stop sign and allegedly brandished a gun, something felt strangely familiar to De’Anton Gipson.

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