Meribah Knight

Reporter

Meribah Knight is a journalist who recently relocated to Nashville from Chicago, where she covered business, the economy, housing, crime and transportation.

Most recently she was a staff reporter with Crain’s Chicago Business covering manufacturing in the Rust Belt, aviation and transportation. Prior to Crain’s she was a staff reporter with the Chicago News Cooperative, producing the Chicago section of The New York Times. There she covered a wide range of topics from arts & culture to education to poverty. She was an adjunct lecturer at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. 

Her writing has appeared The New York TimesThe New YorkerO, The Oprah MagazineUtne Reader, American Craft, Chicago Magazine, Crain’s Chicago Business and The Chicago Reader. Her radio and multimedia work has been featured on WBEZ, The PBS News Hour and Chicago Public Television. 

A native of Cambridge, Mass., Meribah has a Masters of Journalism from Northwestern University and a BA from New York University. She lives in Donelson with her husband, a photojournalist with the Tennessean, and their four cats. 

Ways to Connect

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Following the February shooting of a man at the hands of a Metro Police officer, demands are mounting to create a civilian review board. It would oversee and arbitrate complaints leveled against the Nashville police. A coalition of grassroots activists is beginning to draft a plan, and council members are weighing their support. But Mayor Megan Barry says she’s not interested.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

This installment of Curious Nashville is a seemingly simple one, but with its own set of twists and turns. Our question asker Melinda Welton, wanted to know:

"Where is construction waste from new construction in Nashville going?”

Courtsey of Open Table Nashville

South Nashville's Glencliff United Methodist Church has cleared all the bureaucratic hurdles to build a cluster of tiny homes for the homeless on its property. The only problem is the neighborhood hates the idea. They’ve hurled insults, fumed on Facebook and threatened to picket church services.

Jocques Clemmons memorial horizontal
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The Davidson County Medical Examiner has released the autopsy report for Jocques Clemmons, the man who was fatally shot by a Metro Police officer in the Cayce Homes last month. It confirms that Clemmons was shot twice in the back, and once in the hip.

Rental Realities via Flickr

Residents are pushing back as yet another one of Nashville’s affordable apartment complexes gets snapped up by investors. A group of Somali immigrants have banded together against a private equity firm set to take over their apartment building in Southeast Nashville.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Rodney Northington is an unlikely person to be telling folks who live in the James Cayce housing projects to put down their guns. He’s a convicted felon, a former drug dealer and at one-time a high-ranking gang member. But he’s also, quite possibly, the perfect man for the job.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Nashville’s Police Department wants to bring back the neighborhood cop—on foot. It’s not an obvious choice for a sprawling city like Nashville. But it’s one that aims to put the community back into policing.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

The McFerrin Park Community Center is still patched with plywood after bullets shattered the front doors and various windows. A week ago, two teens were shot and injured outside the center when a group of masked men drove up, aimed, and fired a flurry of bullets toward the front door, forcing the kids inside to run for cover. The police say they have not yet apprehended the suspects.

It’s going to cost significantly more than expected to outfit the Metro Police Department with body cameras. But Chief Steve Anderson says the hefty price tag is the cost of transparency.

Anderson says it’s the most expensive request he’s ever made: $50 million to deploy body cameras to the force’s 1400 officers and their vehicles. And the hardware is just a fraction of that. There’s storage, software, infrastructure, a back-up system. He’s requesting money to hire another two dozen officers just to handle the deluge of footage.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

The Nashville police department is getting rid of a 31-year-old, racially charged textbook that is issued to every academy recruit.

The decision comes after WPLN pressed the police department on its use of Tactical Edge, a book covering high risk patrol, in a story that aired Monday.

Pages