Julieta Martinelli | Nashville Public Radio

Julieta Martinelli

Reporter

Martinelli is the 2017-2018 newsroom fellow at WPLN. She began as an intern in summer 2017, where she reported on criminal justice, immigration and social issues among other topics. Before arriving in Nashville, she split her time between the assignment desk and assisting the investigative team at CBS-46 in Atlanta. 

Martinelli spent five years working at an Atlanta law firm. Previously she worked as a writer and copy editor for Real Atlanta Magazine, a now-defunct bilingual monthly. She's also written for Gwinnett Daily Post and Atlanta Latino, where she reported in Spanish on immigration, education and issues affecting the Hispanic community in Georgia. Martinelli is a National Association of Hispanic Journalists scholarship winner, a NAHJ-NABJ 2016 Student Projects fellow and in 2017 was named a Chips Quinn Scholar by the Newseum Institute.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

An 80-year-old Indiana couple is getting some welcome attention as they finish a quest to eat at every Cracker Barrel in the nation. The Lebanon-based restaurant chain has 645 restaurants in 44 states. Ray and Wilma Yoder have been to all but one.

Stacey Kennedy via Pixabay

Undocumented students in Tennessee have been fighting for in-state tuition for years without getting very far. So, when the governor supported their proposal earlier this year, many felt like they finally had a chance. Then, legislation failed — again.

For undocumented students hoping to go to college this fall, another year of waiting. But as public policy stalls, Tennessee's private sector is stepping up to help them continue their education.

Archive / Library of Congress

Sixty years ago, Bobby Cain became the first African-American man to graduate from an integrated high school in the South. Just one year prior, he and 11 other black students had enrolled at Clinton High School in East Tennessee. They became known as the Clinton 12.  

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

When Nashville foodies think about goats, they probably don’t imagine a succulent steak. But Tennessee State University says the number of people who see goat meat as a staple in their diet is growing, and their research can help local farmers step in to fill the demand. 

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Diversity in Nashville continues to be disproportionately low even years after the school district set out guidelines to increase it. Almost one-third of all Metro Nashville students identify as African American, Hispanic or Asian, yet just 16 percent of the teachers that they see everyday look like them, according to a study released by a coalition of nine teacher preparation programs.

The group, called Trailblazer Coalition, is funded by Conexion Americas.

Project Return / Facebook Page

Felons find themselves in a precarious position when they walk out of prison — they often have limited work experience, a criminal background and no time for extensive training. Whether they will return to prison — or not — can come down to one big question: Can they find a job?

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

It’s unclear when — if ever — a proposed ordinance limiting Davidson County's cooperation with federal immigration authorities will be voted on. It was originally scheduled for final passage in the Metro Council on July 6, but the sponsoring councilmen pulled the measure. They say there is no imminent plan to reintroduce the proposals, though they plan to keep the conversation alive. 

Bill Haslam / Flickr

 

District Attorney Glenn Funk is defending state investigators’ decision not to re-interview a key witness in the fatal shooting of Jocques Clemmons by a city police officer. Funk said the investigation’s mission was to gather the facts independently, and he trusted state agents to do just that.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A new report by Middle Tennessee State University highlights the impact that the school's presence has on skilled workforce and economic growth across the state. MTSU, which has one of the largest undergraduate population in the state, generated more than $1 billion for businesses across the state last year. Half of that came from student spending.

Courtesy Office of the Mayor

People who work with teenagers don’t understand why gun violence is on the rise again. In less than six months, the number of teen deaths in Nashville has already matched the death toll for all of last year. 

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