Julieta Martinelli | Nashville Public Radio

Julieta Martinelli

Reporter

Martinelli is the 2017-2018 newsroom fellow at WPLN. She began as an intern in summer 2017, where she reported on criminal justice, immigration and social issues among other topics. Before arriving in Nashville, she split her time between the assignment desk and assisting the investigative team at CBS-46 in Atlanta. 

Martinelli spent five years working at an Atlanta law firm. Previously she worked as a writer and copy editor for Real Atlanta Magazine, a now-defunct bilingual monthly. She's also written for Gwinnett Daily Post and Atlanta Latino, where she reported in Spanish on immigration, education and issues affecting the Hispanic community in Georgia. Martinelli is a National Association of Hispanic Journalists scholarship winner, a NAHJ-NABJ 2016 Student Projects fellow and in 2017 was named a Chips Quinn Scholar by the Newseum Institute.

screenshot, help4tn.org

Some courthouses in Tennessee will soon have a special laptop computer and printer in their lobbies, called “court kiosks.” They're designed to help those who can’t afford — or choose not to hire — a lawyer, and are representing themselves in civil cases.

Metro Schools classroom
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

While most Metro Nashville teachers believe their schools have high academic expectations for students, more than half of them also believe it's difficult for students to get extra support when they need it.  

 

Those are some of the results from the largest internal survey ever conducted by the district, which polled teachers, students and staff members at all 170 schools.

 

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

 


Nashville’s Fisk University has joined a national effort to double the number of minorities in leadership positions at art museums. Right now only 16 percent of those jobs are held by minorities.

Optoro.com

 


As the holiday shopping season ends and return season begins, customers might not realize that many of those items they send back could end up in landfills across the country.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A Nashville man facing another decade in prison, a year and a half after his release, may be able to continue his life on the outside.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN


Editor's note: On Friday night, a judge postponed Matthew Charles's hearing. See the update here.

 

Last year, a Nashville man got an unlikely chance at redemption.

Matthew Charles walked out of a federal prison a decade before the end of his term, after the Obama administration reduced the minimum sentence guidelines for dealing crack. He has spent the past year and a half rebuilding his life.

But now in a rare case, a higher court says he needs to go back behind bars.

Metro Nashville Youtube Channel

A proposal to create a community oversight board — an independent agency with the right to investigate citizen complaints about police — has been the subject of heated debate in Nashville.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A group of eight women participated in a special ceremony late last week inside the Tennessee Prison For Women in Nashville. It was their graduation — after most of them spent more than a decade working towards their bachelor’s degrees from Lipscomb University.

TDOC

 


The Tennessee Department of Correction is getting another year to show improvement. Officials voted to reauthorize the state agency for 12 more months after a scathing audit last month highlighted severe staffing and safety concerns at several private prisons.

Flickr.com/v1ctor

The city’s top prosecutor and top public defender don't agree on what bail reform might look like in Nashville. The two legal officials presented their views at a public forum this week.

Money bail has been a recurring topic for proponents of criminal justice reform who say it keeps poor citizens in jail longer than necessary, and recently some have singled out Davidson County for its bail policies.

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