Julieta Martinelli

Reporter

Martinelli is the 2017-2018 newsroom fellow at WPLN. She began as an intern in summer 2017, where she reported on immigration, social issues and criminal justice issues, among other topics. Before arriving in Nashville, she split her time between the assignment desk and the investigative team at CBS 46, one of Atlanta's top-rated news stations. She has produced news segments and worked as a production manager for several live shows produced in conjunction with Georgia Public Broadcasting.  She graduated with a degree in Journalism and a minor in criminal justice from Georgia State University in May 2017. 

Before attaining her degree, Martinelli spent five years managing operations and media for a major Atlanta law firm and also worked as a writer and copy editor for Real Atlanta Magazine, a now-defunct bilingual monthly. She has previously interned at Gwinnett Daily Post, Georgia's second largest daily newspaper, and Atlanta Latino, a Spanish-language weekly, where she stayed on to report on immigration, education and issues affecting the local community. Martinelli is a National Association of Hispanic Journalists scholarship winner, a NAHJ-NABJ 2016 Student Projects fellow and in 2017 was named a Chips Quinn Scholar by the Newseum Institute.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

When Nashville foodies think about goats, they probably don’t imagine a succulent steak. But Tennessee State University says the number of people who see goat meat as a staple in their diet is growing, and their research can help local farmers step in to fill the demand. 

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Diversity in Nashville continues to be disproportionately low even years after the school district set out guidelines to increase it. Almost one-third of all Metro Nashville students identify as African American, Hispanic or Asian, yet just 16 percent of the teachers that they see everyday look like them, according to a study released by a coalition of nine teacher preparation programs.

The group, called Trailblazer Coalition, is funded by Conexion Americas.

Project Return / Facebook Page

Felons find themselves in a precarious position when they walk out of prison — they often have limited work experience, a criminal background and no time for extensive training. Whether they will return to prison — or not — can come down to one big question: Can they find a job?

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

It’s unclear when — if ever — a proposed ordinance limiting Davidson County's cooperation with federal immigration authorities will be voted on. It was originally scheduled for final passage in the Metro Council on July 6, but the sponsoring councilmen pulled the measure. They say there is no imminent plan to reintroduce the proposals, though they plan to keep the conversation alive. 

Bill Haslam / Flickr

 

District Attorney Glenn Funk is defending state investigators’ decision not to re-interview a key witness in the fatal shooting of Jocques Clemmons by a city police officer. Funk said the investigation’s mission was to gather the facts independently, and he trusted state agents to do just that.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

A new report by Middle Tennessee State University highlights the impact that the school's presence has on skilled workforce and economic growth across the state. MTSU, which has one of the largest undergraduate population in the state, generated more than $1 billion for businesses across the state last year. Half of that came from student spending.

Courtesy Office of the Mayor

People who work with teenagers don’t understand why gun violence is on the rise again. In less than six months, the number of teen deaths in Nashville has already matched the death toll for all of last year. 

COURTESY MNPD

The state’s top law enforcement agency promised a complete and thorough investigation into the fatal shooting of a Nashville man by a city police officer. But a WPLN examination of a 600-page case file casts doubt on the thoroughness of the probe, and it reveals discrepancies between how the case was investigated and how officials have been describing their work for months.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

The first building of a multimillion-dollar overhaul in East Nashville’s Cayce Homes will open in July. A ceremonial ribbon cutting was held today. It’s the city’s first new public housing in almost two decades. But it doesn’t quite represent the social integration envisioned by the larger redevelopment. 

courtesy Tennessee Department of Veterans

A former Murfreesboro soldier is coming home. Technical Sergeant William O’Kieff died in a plane crash during the Vietnam War. It would take nearly 50 years for his remains to be identified.

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