Julieta Martinelli | Nashville Public Radio

Julieta Martinelli

Reporter

Martinelli is the 2017-2018 newsroom fellow at WPLN. She began as an intern in summer 2017, where she reported on criminal justice, immigration and social issues among other topics. Before arriving in Nashville, she split her time between the assignment desk and assisting the investigative team at CBS-46 in Atlanta. 

Martinelli spent five years working at an Atlanta law firm. Previously she worked as a writer and copy editor for Real Atlanta Magazine, a now-defunct bilingual monthly. She's also written for Gwinnett Daily Post and Atlanta Latino, where she reported in Spanish on immigration, education and issues affecting the Hispanic community in Georgia. Martinelli is a National Association of Hispanic Journalists scholarship winner, a NAHJ-NABJ 2016 Student Projects fellow and in 2017 was named a Chips Quinn Scholar by the Newseum Institute.

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A group of local activists is launching a petition to resurrect the proposal for a police community oversight board. The goal is to get a referendum on the November ballot so Nashville voters can decide whether community oversight of police is necessary.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN


Matthew Charles understands patience. Twenty years in prison will do that.

It was quite a sprint — and Metro has now concluded its budget hearings, which will inform the budget that's due soon from Mayor David Briley.

Nashville Defenders website

The city’s top public defender says her office is overworked and understaffed, but she doesn’t think it’s Metro’s responsibility to fix it.

Speaking at a budget hearing Tuesday, Dawn Deaner pointed out that — like the district attorney — her office serves primarily a state function. Public defenders are tasked with representing defendants facing criminal charges who can’t afford to hire a lawyer.

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation TBI sex trafficking
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

There’s no question about it: the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation is busy. And not just managing the state’s three crime labs, tracking down fugitives or undertaking major investigations.

 

Since the beginning of the year, the state agency has already been called on to investigate 13 shootings by police officers. Four of those took place in just a matter of two days.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

The Tennessee Legislature has revived debate over granting in-state tuition to undocumented students. On Tuesday afternoon, a House subcommittee took the first action for the year, approving a bill which would allow all students who spend at least three years in a Tennessee high school to pay in-state rates at public colleges, regardless of their immigration status.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Just 24 hours after Mayor Megan Barry plead guilty to felony theft and announced her resignation from office, two of four pending investigations into her conduct have winded down.

MNPD

As part of Mayor Megan Barry’s plea deal, she will have to serve three years of unsupervised probation.

And once that’s over? The Mayor may end up with a clean record.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Getting arrested anywhere is expensive. Defendants often have to deal with court costs, legal fees, restitution and fines. In Nashville, it can be even costlier.

But that could change today, after Metro Council members vote to do away with the city’s “jail fee” for misdemeanor arrests — the $44 billed to defendants for every day they sit in a Metro jail waiting to see a judge.

File photo. Blake Farmer / WPLN

 


A Metro council member has filed a bill that would allow the city's ethics board to also investigate violations of executive orders. The filling comes after lawyers working for the committee said the group might not have the authority to investigate a complaint filed against Mayor Megan Barry

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