Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national breaking news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 to work as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast, which has grown into a fleet of shows with live events. She became assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She was named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for audio feature reporting.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Emily Siner / WPLN

 Of the many high school students who applied for Tennessee Promise, three-quarters are taking the next required step to get free community college: meeting their mentors. These are volunteers who will help them through the college application process.

Emily Siner / WPLN

One of the seven major candidates running for Nashville's mayor told supporters she plans to avoid running negative ads during her campaign. 

Linda Rebrovick, a businesswoman and CEO of market research firm Consensus Point, unveiled her platform Thursday at the Entrepreneur Center. Rebrovick said she wants to keep Nashville business-friendly and install new technology around the city, and then she talked about the vision for her campaign:

Emily Siner / WPLN

Updated Jan. 28 to include statements from competing internet providers

A few minutes before noon Tuesday at Nashville’s Entrepreneur Center, a wall partition lifted and revealed a sign on stage: “Nashville, Fiber is coming.”

Google Fiber’s long-anticipated announcement brought a flurry of excitement from Nashville entrepreneurs, who hope it could thrust the city’s technology industry into the spotlight.

U.S. Department of Agriculture via Flickr

Updated March 6 to reflect new budget projections

The president of the University of Tennessee made a dire statement to the governor last month: Joe DiPietro said the business model of Tennessee’s public universities is “broken.” He pointed to low funding from the state and rising tuition costs for students.

In a recent interview with WPLN, DiPietro said he has learned that he couldn’t count on the state to give the university system the funding that he thinks it deserves.

Google Fiber screenshot

Updated Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.: Citing unnamed sources, the Wall Street Journal is now reporting that Google Fiber will expand to four metro areas — Atlanta, Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham and Nashville. WPLN's Emily Siner will be live tweeting Nashville's press conference at noon. Follow @SinerSays for more.

Brent Whitmore / / Vanderbilt Kennedy Center

Inside a lab at the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Reyna Gordon is holding up a tangle of elastic wires connected to electrodes.

“For the kids, we call it a spaghetti hat,” she says with a laugh.

Gordon, a music cognition researcher, fits the spaghetti hat over my head like a shower cap. The electrodes touch dozens of points on my skull. This is how she looks at my brain waves, she explains.

University of Tennessee

Representatives from 76 Tennessee colleges and universities are meeting in Nashville this week to discuss how to better address sexual assault.

The conference comes the same week that a trial wraps up over a high-profile rape case involving students at Vanderbilt University, and several weeks after two University of Tennessee football players were accused of sexual assault.

Emily Siner / WPLN

A four-hour listening session at Fort Campbell last night — with more than 1,300 people attending — made a case to military higher-ups about why the army post should be spared reductions.

The Army could cut up to 16,000 permanent positions at the post by 2020, about half of the current population. Worst case scenario: Between soldiers and their families, 40,000 people would leave the Fort Campbell area.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

After an impassioned campaign over Amendment 1, groups on both sides of Tennessee’s abortion debate are surprisingly practical about what they can accomplish in the legislature this year.


As President Obama announced his free community college plan in Knoxville on Friday afternoon, he was joined by top Republican lawmakers. But this doesn’t necessarily mean Obama’s proposal is getting bipartisan support.

Obama applauded Gov. Bill Haslam for implementing a statewide program, called Tennessee Promise, to pay community college tuition for all graduating high school seniors. The president also highlighted a similar initiative in Chicago.