Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national breaking news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 to work as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast, which has grown into a fleet of shows with live events. She became assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She was named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for audio feature reporting.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Sergei 5of7 via Flickr

A jury in Chattanooga is deliberating in a fraud trial involving executives from the largest privately held company in Tennessee: truck stop chain Pilot Flying J.

The Bent Tree via Flickr

A higher percentage of high school seniors from Tennessee have filled out their federal financial aid forms for college than from any other state. 

It's a familiar refrain for state higher education officials: Tennessee has led the nation ever since Tennessee Promise went into effect in 2015, requiring students to fill out the financial aid form to stay eligible for free community or technical college. But the attention paid to filing rates — just one step in a long process of getting students into college — shows its importance as an indicator of how many students will end up continuing their education.

TN Photo Services (file)

Tennessee has put a spotlight on its community colleges in recent years, making these higher education institutions the focus of programs like Tennessee Promise. Now, state officials are trying to give technical colleges the same boost — and they're starting by trying to win over high school guidance counselors.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Rip Patton was arrested in 1961. That's when he and a group of other college students drove from Nashville to Alabama to join the Freedom Rides, where they boarded Greyhound busses and attempted to use white-only lunch counters and bathrooms throughout the South.

Courtesy of Tennessee State University

Tennessee State University's marching band performed at a showcase in Atlanta this weekend that came with a hefty grant — and a shoutout to one of its most famous alumni.

The school was one of eight historically black colleges and universities selected to perform at the Honda Battle of the Bands, an annual celebration of music education. TSU's marching band, called the Aristocrat of Bands, was dressed in school colors of blue and white and played in formation on a football field, at one point spelling out "OPRAH" — who, as the announcer pointed out, is a graduate of the school.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The allegations of sexual misconduct that have ricocheted through Hollywood and other industries have largely missed the Nashville music scene. But in private conversations and online forums, many female songwriters say they've had moments with collaborators that border on harassment and even assault.

#15: The Disrupter

Jan 12, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

More than 50 years ago, Rip Patton's world changed. He started attending nonviolence workshops in Nashville and learned how to endure abuse during the Civil Rights movement without fighting back. Rip became a Freedom Rider, part of the movement that ended an era of legalized segregation in the South.

Now, five decades later, he looks back on his role as a "disrupter" — sitting, standing and singing to make major societal change.

Pages