Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national breaking news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 to work as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast, which has grown into a fleet of shows with live events. She became assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She was named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for audio feature reporting.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The allegations of sexual misconduct that have ricocheted through Hollywood and other industries have largely missed the Nashville music scene. But in private conversations and online forums, many female songwriters say they've had moments with collaborators that border on harassment and even assault.

#15: The Disrupter

Jan 12, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

More than 50 years ago, Rip Patton's world changed. He started attending nonviolence workshops in Nashville and learned how to endure abuse during the Civil Rights movement without fighting back. Rip became a Freedom Rider, part of the movement that ended an era of legalized segregation in the South.

Now, five decades later, he looks back on his role as a "disrupter" — sitting, standing and singing to make major societal change.

Donn Jones / Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp.

Nashville's biggest New Year's Eve party is getting extra security this year: The 100,000 people expected to attend the celebration on Bicentennial Mall will have to pass through metal detectors for the first time.

But the biggest threat organizers see to event-goers isn't terrorism or a gunman — it's the weather. 

Megan Barry MLS announcement
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

It’s official: Major League Soccer is bringing a top-level team to Nashville.

Calling it a “city on the rise,” MLS commissioner Don Garber made the announcement at the Country Music Hall of Fame on Wednesday afternoon.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

As a palliative care doctor at Alive Hospice, Sasha Bowers has been there at the very end of life for a lot of people. This exposure to the dying has given her a perspective on death that most people don't have, and she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what she's learned.


Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Every weekday morning, public radio listeners across Middle Tennessee tune in to the dulcet voice of WPLN morning host Jason Moon Wilkins. Presumably, when they hear him, most listeners are interested in the news he's sharing and the local stories he's playing. But eventually, one anonymous listener started wondering about Jason Moon Wilkins himself, submitting this Curious Nashville question:

If Jason Moon Wilkins was in a line arranged alphabetically by last name for the rope climb in gym class, is he in the middle or at the end?

Courtesy of Jay Kholos

In 1920, a Jewish family moved from New York to Union City, Tennessee. It was a novel enough occurrence that, nearly a century later, their story has been adapted into a musical, called "Jew Store," which is coming through Nashville this weekend.

And while the name may sound provocative, it also illuminates an often forgotten piece of Southern history.

Reader Of The Pack via Flickr

The latest research from a Vanderbilt University neuroscientist has some potentially controversial findings, depending on your pet preference: Suzana Herculano-Houzel's team found that dogs have more neurons in their cerebral cortex than cats.

But does this mean dogs are smarter? Not necessarily.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

Talking to college students about death might not seem like the most comfortable conversation, but that is Andrea Mills' job. She teaches a death and dying psychology class at Lipscomb University, where she delves into how people deal with the end of life. She talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our podcast Movers & Thinkers about what's unique to our culture and time, and what seems to be universal.

DCSO via Facebook

Davidson County's Sheriff says closing Nashville General Hospital's inpatient services could quadruple the amount his agency has to spend on securing inmates while they receive medical care.

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