Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Ed Rode / Fisk University

Fisk University's new president wants to build more relationships in Nashville.

In a recent interview with WPLN, Kevin Rome said the historically black college has a positive reputation nationally, but locally it's battling its history of unstable leadership and financial troubles. That narrative that has long frustrated university officials, which says they have plenty to be proud of.

Emily Siner / WPLN

One of the largest collections of books and manuscripts about the history of playing cards is now in the possession of the Vanderbilt library.

The university has purchased more than a thousand pieces of memorabilia that previously belonged to Bicycle Cards, which the library hopes will make Vanderbilt a destination for scholars around the world.

Emily Siner / WPLN

For most people, recycling means placing an empty soda can or some scrap paper in a blue bin. They might take that bin to the curb or to a drop-off site. But beyond that, the process is mysterious, filled with arbitrary rules and a vague reassurance that we're doing the right thing for the environment.

So WPLN listener Mark McCaw, an avid recycler, asked us this question:

What happens if I put the wrong item in the recycling bin?

Emily Siner / WPLN

For people in Nashville who keep Kosher, following Jewish dietary laws, there's almost nowhere to dine out. One of the only Kosher-certified establishments was Woodlands, an Indian restaurant on West End — and that closed earlier this year.

But now another business has decided to go through the extensive process: Avo, a vegan restaurant housed in an old shipping container off of Charlotte Avenue.

Emily Siner / WPLN

There was a highly anticipated announcement yesterday after months of little information — and no, we're not talking about Taylor Swift's new album.

Google Fiber told residents of Sylvan Park that its gigabit speed service is finally available. But even for some Fiber fans, the wait proved too long, especially as other telecomm companies lined up for their business.

Emily Siner / WPLN

It's often easy to tell how old someone is based on the earliest major event they can remember — and for some first graders at Carroll Oakland School in Lebanon, the rare solar eclipse may be that moment.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

We've seen plenty of photos of what the total solar eclipse looked like — but what did it sound like? Fortunately, WPLN reporters were scattered throughout Middle Tennessee, recorders in hand, to find out. From the eerie pre-eclipse shadows, to the first glimpses of totality, to the sun reappearing, the experience was as aural as it was visual.


Taylor Slifko / APSU

One of the universities closest to the center of totality will document how animals on campus will react to the sudden darkness of Monday's total solar eclipse.

Researchers from Austin Peay State University's agriculture department will record observations on university cattle, bees and crickets.

Screenshot of TN.gov

The University of Tennessee Knoxville did not get the quick stamp of approval it was looking for on its new student code of conduct.

After months of revision and comment periods, UT's new policy needed a committee of state lawmakers to sign off Wednesday to be effective by the time the semester begins next week. Lawmakers did — but not without some contention and caveats. 

University of Tennessee

The University of Tennessee's flagship campus in Knoxville is hoping to implement a new student code of conduct this fall, something that hasn't been done in four decades. UT officials say the changes make the code less punitive and will help students learn from mistakes.

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