Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Tennessee college students photo
TN Photo Services

School hasn't even started for most students, but state officials want high school seniors to start planning for after graduation.

Starting today, the class of 2018 can apply for Tennessee Promise, the governor's signature education plan allowing high school graduates to attend community or technical college tuition-free. Students have to apply to the program by Nov. 1.

Mark Margolis / Rainbow Symphony

The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 is expected to be an attraction for cities along its path, including Nashville. Hotels from Hopkinsville to Murfreesboro are even advertising special eclipse vacation packages to attract the out-of-towners.  

But given it’s been nearly four decades since a similar event in the U.S. — and even longer in Nashville — the city's tourism officials say it’s hard to predict just how much of a boost the city will see.

Emily Siner / WPLN

In this episode of Movers & Thinkers, we interview Tiana Clark, a poet from Nashville.

Tiana has been tackling uncomfortable truths for years, ever since she wrote in her diary as a child that she hated her mom (who then discovered the writing). Now, she is a nationally lauded poet from Nashville who is the author of Equilibrium, a book of poetry published in 2016. She has a forthcoming poem in The New Yorker.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The Grand Ole Opry is country music's Holy Land.

It's home to the weekly radio show that put country on the national map in 1925. And it's where this summer, 30 people with a rare genetic disorder called Williams syndrome eagerly arrive backstage.

3rd Brigade Combat Team

More than 1,300 soldiers from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, who were deployed last year to Afghanistan, are now back at Fort Campbell. The last troops arrived over the weekend. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

The head of the Tennessee Board of Regents says she plans to change how the leaders of community colleges are evaluated.

Flora Tydings took the helm of the public higher education system about six months ago, amid a rocky period for some higher education administrators. During that time, three college presidents have been publicly criticized by their faculty.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory hope a new federal grant will help them turn plants into fuel. The Department of Energy announced this week that it's providing $12 million next year to the lab in East Tennessee, with the potential for more than $100 million over the next five years. 

Parents pass on their genes, their values — and sometimes, their careers. When children grow up and take over the family business, how does their relationship with parents change? Do familial ties make them see the work differently? And what responsibility do they feel to pass it on to the next generation?

Mike Mozart via Flickr

More than a dozen walk-in health care clinics inside Walgreens locations will soon carry the Vanderbilt name. The medical center is taking over these Middle Tennessee clinics as part of its efforts to reach more patients cheaply.

U.S. Department of Energy

What might be the most ambitious health care data analysis to date is happening in East Tennessee.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working through a massive batch of records from the Department of Veterans Affairs — the records that VA doctors keep on their more than 22 million patients. About a quarter of a million veterans have also donated their genome sequence — basically, their DNA — to the VA, which has been handed over to the national lab.

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