Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

News Director

Emily Siner is the news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national breaking news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

Emily began at the station in 2014 to work as an enterprise reporter. She soon launched the station's first podcast, which has grown into a fleet of shows with live events. She became assistant news director in 2016 and news director in 2017.  She was named the Associated Press Radio Journalist of the Year and received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for audio feature reporting.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

vote election
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Beyond the transit proposal, Democratic voters in Davidson County also had a long list of primary elections to decide.

In a highly watched contest, prosecutor Ana Escobar bested former Metro Councilman Nick Leonardo for the nomination to a General Sessions judge position. Leonardo had been appointed to the seat in January, but Escobar was favorite of the Nashville Bar Association and used her expertise on domestic violence as a central point in her campaign. The General Sessions Court Division III focuses on domestic violence.

Jack Corn / Courtesy of the Frist and The Tennessean

Some of the closest witnesses to the Nashville Civil Rights movement were photographers from the city's two major newspapers at the time, The Tennessean and the Nashville Banner. A selection of their photos — and the Frist Art Museum's latest exhibit that displays them — offer a glimpse into how media outlets chose to cover the events.

#16: What Is Love?

Apr 18, 2018
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Without a doubt, romantic love is a driving force in our culture — with countless movies, songs and books devoted to finding it, losing it or making it last. Falling in (or out of) love can feel so intense in our own lives, but our fundamental assumptions about what love really is are not always correct.

In this episode of Movers & Thinkers, we talk to three guests who have seen a lot of love, heartbreak and romantic confusion: relationship therapist Jeannie Ingram, divorce attorney Siew-Ling Shea, and Alex Pollack, a writer who muses on modern dating culture.

Jason Mrachina via Flickr

The Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville has officially changed its name. While the re-branding is subtle, the museum hopes the shift will bring more visitors inside.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers are starting to wind up business for the year, but there are still several big debates left to resolve.

School security. Medical marijuana. And marriage laws, to name a few.

WPLN's Emily Siner talked to our statehouse reporter Chas Sisk about what’s at stake in those debates.

As the #MeToo movement ricochets through Hollywood and into other industries, Nashville musicians and legislators alike appear to be coming to terms with the country music industry's role in dealing with sexual harassment.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Players with the Nashville Symphony are giving up their personal instruments for a concert this weekend and instead playing what are called the Violins of Hope — a collection of about two dozen string instruments that were once owned by Jews who survived the Holocaust. 

Bess Pearson / Courtesy of Stand Up Sewanee

Sewanee has decided to revoke one of its honorary degrees — a first for the Episcopal school. 

Chas Sisk / WPLN

The two men charged with vandalizing the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro last summer formally apologized for their actions during a Friday afternoon service at the mosque.

WPLN

Former Davidson County Judge Casey Moreland was taken into custody again Thursday after the FBI filed an obstruction of justice charge against him. This comes almost exactly one year after he was accused of the same thing — trying to interfere with an ongoing FBI investigation into his actions.

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