Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Emily Siner / WPLN

When Nashville residents drop off their glass bottles, paint cans and old batteries to recycle, they can now also bring food scraps.

Aja Bain / courtesy Historic Nashville

Usually, the nonprofit called Historic Nashville selects nine sites around the city that it thinks are endangered and should be preserved.

This year, it selected one: Fort Negley.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Every instrument that Manuel Delgado makes in Nashville bears a logo with his last name. Delgado Guitars. He learned from his father, who learned from his father, who started a luthier business in Mexico in the early 1900s. Manuel talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our live series Movers & Thinkers about that extra sense of responsibility he feels because of the family legacy.


courtesy MNPS

Nashville has received $15 million to help out some of its public magnet schools. The U.S. Department of Education grant will get distributed among five elementary schools with large Hispanic or African American populations.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Updated at 4:45 p.m.

One person was killed and seven were injured when a gunman opened fire at Burnette Chapel Church of Christ in Antioch, according to the Nashville Police Department. The shooter, identified by police as 25-year-old Emanuel Kidego Samson, was also wounded.

The president of Nashville State Community College is retiring effective Dec. 31, the middle of the school year. His announcement Wednesday follows a lengthy tenure that was marked by impressive growth as well as flare-ups with some faculty.

Oak Ridge Public Library

Seventy-five years ago this week, the federal government quietly took over 60,000 acres nestled in the ridges of East Tennessee. It was the beginning of Oak Ridge: a city cloaked in secrecy that tens of thousands of people flocked to during World War II, most unknowingly helping to build the world's first atomic bomb.

Emily Siner / WPLN

For the most fragile babies, there's one thing that's almost guaranteed to boost their chances of survival: breast milk.

So a nonprofit in Nashville is trying to make it easier for infants to obtain it when their mothers can't produce enough. Their goal is to open a breast milk bank, similar to a blood bank, that would store and distribute donations from other moms.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Parents pass on their genes, their values — and sometimes, their careers. These guests have taken on the family business, which has connected them more to their parents but, at times, tested their relationships and created lofty expectations. Featuring third-generation luthier Manuel Delgado, second-generation pastor Amy Mears, and poet Caroline Randall Williams, who has written books with her mother. 

Nashville glass recycling
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

After releasing our latest Curious Nashville episode on what happens when you put the wrong thing in the recycling bin, we started getting questions from more curious listeners about how recycling works in Nashville.

Pages