Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Mack Linebaugh/WPLN

In honor of #throwbackThursday, it seems fitting to share this Movers & Thinkers anniversary: The first live show of this podcast took place almost exactly two years ago. This is my heartfelt audio thank-you note.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

We live in a society where what we do often defines how we see ourselves: Our identity is tied up with careers and success. So what happens when we're forced to leave an old identity behind and start over? 

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

There’s a frustrating phenomenon that happens to some people who are very successful. Take Kelly Holly-Bockelmann, an astrophysicist at Vanderbilt: Even after getting multiple degrees and receiving high-profile grants, she says she still often feels like she’s not good enough. And that feeling can intensify the more successful she gets. She talked to WPLN’s Emily Siner during the live taping of our Movers & Thinkers podcast about the dreaded "imposter syndrome." 

AMSF2011 via Flickr

Last month, Sen. Lamar Alexander proposed a bill intended to help people who live where health insurance companies are pulling out of the Affordable Care Act marketplace. It would apply nationwide but indirectly references one specific organization in the senator's home state: Tennessee Farm Bureau.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Three weeks before the restaurant Lulu was scheduled to open, the building on Jefferson Street was in a state of disarray. Cardboard boxes filled with dishwasher racks and food processors were piled high against the window. Workmen were installing floors and sinks.

Emily Siner / WPLN

The agency that oversees health insurance in Tennessee approves of a new proposal that would change how some people can buy insurance.

Sens. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker introduced the bill in Congress yesterday to allow people to use federal tax subsidies on more insurance plans.

WPLN

Judge Casey Moreland was arrested at his home this morning after the FBI accused him of trying to "obstruct justice through bribery and witness tampering." A U.S. attorney announced the news at a press conference Tuesday morning. 

The formal complaint filed against Moreland is explicit, detailing allegations that he had sexual relationships with at least two women in what seemed to be an exchange for getting them out of criminal charges and unpaid court fees.

Tennessee Tech University

Six public universities who had been part of the Tennessee Board of Regents are holding their first independent board meetings over the next few weeks.

It marks a major change in the way decisions at the schools are made. When the president of Tennessee Tech University, Philip Oldham, opened its inaugural board meeting on Thursday, he called it "truly a historic occasion."

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

These people are unapologetic nerds — passionate about highly technical fields and not afraid to show it. How do they communicate that to people who don't understand the thing they love? And in a broader culture where that word is not always seen as positive, how did they come to embrace their nerd status? Featuring astrophysicist Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, Star Wars maker Chris Lee and computer programmer (and late nerd bloomer) Morley Bankston.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Over the past year and a half, doctors and researchers in Nashville have diagnosed eight of the rarest genetic diseases. One doctor on the team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center says its progress is now speeding up.

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