Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Taylor Slifko / APSU

One of the universities closest to the center of totality will document how animals on campus will react to the sudden darkness of Monday's total solar eclipse.

Researchers from Austin Peay State University's agriculture department will record observations on university cattle, bees and crickets.

Screenshot of TN.gov

The University of Tennessee Knoxville did not get the quick stamp of approval it was looking for on its new student code of conduct.

After months of revision and comment periods, UT's new policy needed a committee of state lawmakers to sign off Wednesday to be effective by the time the semester begins next week. Lawmakers did — but not without some contention and caveats. 

University of Tennessee

The University of Tennessee's flagship campus in Knoxville is hoping to implement a new student code of conduct this fall, something that hasn't been done in four decades. UT officials say the changes make the code less punitive and will help students learn from mistakes.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

For all the tourism records being set in Nashville, there is one area that's lagging behind: The number of large conventions coming to town this fall is lower than in previous years, and tourism leaders say the city's high hotel demand bears part of the blame.

J. Intintoli / MTSU

Unlike in Davidson County, schools in Rutherford will be in session on Monday, Aug. 21. So MTSU is helping teachers in Murfreesboro and surrounding areas prepare their students for the total solar eclipse. 

The university's astronomy department has created lesson plans for K-12 teachers. One lesson has students model the distances between the earth, moon and sun using tennis balls and string. Another shows students how to predict the timing of future eclipses.

Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel

The eclipse passing over Nashville in less than two weeks seems to have everyone's attention now.

But we know there are some of you out there that still just don’t understand what all the hype is about. That’s why we’re going back to the basics: answering five questions that you may have felt too afraid to ask at this point.

Screenshot of APSU's video

Now that all four-year universities in Tennessee have their own governing boards, those schools have to deal directly with issues like accusations of discrimination. At Austin Peay in Clarksville, the board of trustees decided Thursday morning that a recent complaint of gender discrimination was not substantiated. 

TN Photo Services

Tennessee's governor says there's no reason the review process of the Gatlinburg wildfires should be anything but open and transparent. This comes after the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency lost the recordings of all calls from the night the fire started.

Tennessee college students photo
TN Photo Services

School hasn't even started for most students, but state officials want high school seniors to start planning for after graduation.

Starting today, the class of 2018 can apply for Tennessee Promise, the governor's signature education plan allowing high school graduates to attend community or technical college tuition-free. Students have to apply to the program by Nov. 1.

Mark Margolis / Rainbow Symphony

The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 is expected to be an attraction for cities along its path, including Nashville. Hotels from Hopkinsville to Murfreesboro are even advertising special eclipse vacation packages to attract the out-of-towners.  

But given it’s been nearly four decades since a similar event in the U.S. — and even longer in Nashville — the city's tourism officials say it’s hard to predict just how much of a boost the city will see.

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