Emily Siner | Nashville Public Radio

Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kara McLeland / WPLN

When people think about how they want to be remembered after they die, they often envision a headstone in a cemetery. It's intended to preserve the most important details of their life for generations to come.

That's why Fred Zahn with the Metro Historical Commission spends some of his time finding and restoring unmarked graves at the Nashville City Cemetery. Zahn talked to WPLN's Emily Siner for our live series Movers & Thinkers about the power of marking one's legacy.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

The Tennessee Department of Education has been ordered to respond soon to a lawsuit filed by Measurement Incorporated that seeks $25.7 million in payment from the state.

Courtesy of Tennessee Board of Regents

The governor is hearing funding requests from every department in the state this week, and the routine is a familiar one — hit him with the highlights and then ask for money. 

Kara McLeland / WPLN

When someone's parent is somewhat of a star in their field, it can be challenging to follow them into the same line of work. But Nashville poet Caroline Randall Williams says the success of her mother — best-selling author Alice Randall — inspires rather than intimidates her. Caroline talked to WPLN's Emily Siner as part of our live series Movers & Thinkers about how she's adjusted to sharing careers with her mom.

#14: Demystifying Death

Oct 31, 2017
Kara McLeland / WPLN

For something as ubiquitous as dying, most of us know surprisingly little about it — not just the big unanswerable questions, like what happens after we die. We also rarely think about how to deal with grief, or what to talk about with your family before you go.

So on this episode of Movers & Thinkers, we're facing our fears (and fascination) by talking to three people who come face-to-face with mortality on a daily basis: hospice physician Sasha Bowers, cemetery historian Fred Zahn and Death & Dying professor Andrea Mills. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

For such a small school, Fisk University attracts a lot of funding for scientific research.

This is the second year in a row that it's been ranked in the top five liberal arts schools in the country in terms of research dollars, according to Washington Monthly's rankings. It's in part due to the historically black college's efforts to recruit faculty who embrace the school's focus on students but still win big grants.

UT Knoxville

The new chancellor of the University of Tennessee Knoxville laid out a lofty vision for the campus at a ceremony celebrating her new role late Friday.

Rick Diamond / Getty Images for Americana Music

Musician and actress Rhiannon Giddens has been awarded one of the MacArthur "genius grants" for her work "reclaiming African-American contributions to folk and country," the institution says.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

As a young girl, Amy Mears always looked up to her father, who was a Southern Baptist preacher. Mears is now a pastor herself — of a Nashville church. And she talked to WPLN's Emily Siner in our live series, Movers & Thinkers, about what it was like to take up her father's profession at a time when women were almost forbidden from doing so.


Emily Siner / WPLN

On any given night, bars on Nashville's Lower Broadway go through beer bottles by the thousands — which, the city has realized, is a lot of glass.

In the coming months, Nashville will begin to recycle bottles at downtown bars. If it works, it could stop millions of pounds of glass from going into the trash. 

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