Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, science and military veterans. She's traveled around Tennessee to tell national news stories for NPR and Marketplace.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms and spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to share audio online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. She was born and raised in the Chicago area, so she is not intimidated by Nashville winters. Emily is a proud graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

The dilemma of choosing between commercial success and artistic independence is a familiar one for many musicians in Nashville, including Vanessa Carlton. After releasing hits like “A Thousand Miles,” she says she felt stifled by her major labels and decided to go independent, a shift that also changed the way she saw herself.

Carlton talked to WPLN’s Emily Siner in the live taping of our podcast Movers & Thinkers about starting over on her own.


Emily Siner / WPLN

In the era of Facebook Live and other on-demand video, it's perhaps no surprise that the largest celestial event in America this summer will be live-streamed. Students from Vanderbilt University will launch a high-altitude weather balloon — connected to a video camera — to send images of the total solar eclipse back to NASA on Aug. 21.

TN Photo Services

Helping Tennesseans go to college takes more than giving them free tuition: That's one of the takeaways from a report released Monday by Complete Tennessee, a nonprofit that tracks higher education in the state.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

After spending decades working in one industry, it can be hard to walk away from it. But former music manager Chip Peay did just that. 

Webster Public Relations

The family of Bill Monroe is looking for someone to take over his legacy.

The estate of the bluegrass legend and Grand Ole Opry star is selling his name and likeness, along with his hundreds of personal items and live recordings. Fans of the father of bluegrass have the chance to buy the rebuilt cabin and 2 1/2 acres in Kentucky where Bill Monroe lived and played music with his Uncle Pen.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

In our society, what we do often defines how we see ourselves: Our identity is tied up with careers and success. So what happens when we're forced to start over? These people have grappled with reinvention, realizing that it's possible to get out of situations that don't feel right — and figure out how to move forward. Featuring musician Vanessa Carlton, journalist-turned-educator Chris Echegaray and former country music manager Chip Peay.

J. Intintoli / MTSU

Middle Tennessee State University is setting its sights on big federal money — specifically, research grants from funding agencies like the National Science Foundation. After launching a number of Ph.D. programs in the past several years, the school is trying to establish itself as a research powerhouse.

Emily Siner / WPLN

It's not a real Stanley Cup, but it will do for a town that loves music as much as Nashville. Shane Chisholm, an Americana bass player who moved here recently from Canada, has been building upright basses where the body is a homemade replica of the NHL Stanley Cup. The NHL, it turned out, wasn't happy about it.


TN Photo Services

The governor is signing the Tennessee Reconnect Grant into law Wednesday — his signature education bill of the year. It guarantees free community college for any adult over the age of 25 or who qualifies as "independent." As a result, colleges are trying to figure out how they can accommodate an influx of adult students.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Astronomy enthusiasts across the country are already planning out where they’ll be on Aug. 21, when a total solar eclipse will make a path across North America.

As the largest city on that path, Nashville is expecting a boost in tourism from visitors excited about the eclipse. But the Adventure Science Center is also trying to make sure people who live here understand the importance of the celestial occasion, too.

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