Emily Siner

Assistant News Director

Emily Siner is the assistant news director at Nashville Public Radio and host of the Movers & Thinkers podcast. She also reports on a wide range of topics, including higher education, technology and — occasionally — cemeteries.

She's passionate about storytelling on all platforms, and she spoke at TEDxNashville in 2015 about the station's efforts to reach new audiences online. Before joining the news staff at WPLN, Emily worked in the worlds of print and online journalism at the Los Angeles Times and NPR. Born and raised in the Chicago area, she is a proud graduate of the College of Media at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Tennessee Tech University

Six public universities who had been part of the Tennessee Board of Regents are holding their first independent board meetings over the next few weeks.

It marks a major change in the way decisions at the schools are made. When the president of Tennessee Tech University, Philip Oldham, opened its inaugural board meeting on Thursday, he called it "truly a historic occasion."

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

These people are unapologetic nerds — passionate about highly technical fields and not afraid to show it. How do they communicate that to people who don't understand the thing they love? And in a broader culture where that word is not always seen as positive, how did they come to embrace their nerd status? Featuring astrophysicist Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, Star Wars maker Chris Lee and computer programmer (and late nerd bloomer) Morley Bankston.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Over the past year and a half, doctors and researchers in Nashville have diagnosed eight of the rarest genetic diseases. One doctor on the team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center says its progress is now speeding up.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

Several thousand people made it inside Municipal Auditorium Wednesday night to hear President Donald Trump deliver a defiant speech. He thumped a federal judge's ruling on immigration, sparked jeers at former opponent Hillary Clinton and pledged to put a stop to Obamacare.

Wikimedia Commons

More than half the students at Nashville’s Aquinas College will have to transfer to other schools to finish their degrees. The college unexpectedly announced drastic cuts this morning, including laying off 60 of its 76 employees. 

Emily Siner / WPLN

Law enforcement agencies reassured community members Wednesday night that they are working hard to keep Jewish organizations secure and track down the origins of threats. Nashville's Jewish Community Center hosted the discussion after it received three bomb threats since the beginning of January.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Fort Campbell would dearly love to see some of the $54 billion in defense funding that President Trump has proposed. The commanding general of 101st Airborne says that the Army post could use more soldiers, as well as long-awaited updates on buildings.

Emily Siner / WPLN

Some in Tennessee's congressional delegation are reserving full judgment about the new health care plan proposed by House Republicans.

Courtesy of Kate Derrick / Tennessee Higher Education Commission

  

The first class of students who went to community college for free under Tennessee Promise is graduating this spring. Some might go straight into the workforce, some plan to transfer to public universities — but private colleges are starting to make a concerted effort to recruit them, too. 

Courtesy of The Bush Center

A retired sergeant major from Fort Campbell is among the wounded veterans painted by President George W. Bush in a new book released this week, called Portraits of Courage.

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