Chas Sisk | Nashville Public Radio

Chas Sisk

Senior Editor

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 and became an editor in 2018. Previously, he covered state politics for Nashville Public Radio and The Tennessean, and he’s also reported on communities, politics and business for a variety of publications in Massachusetts, New York and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University, where he studied economics and journalism.

Ways to Connect

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Updated 10 p.m. with reaction from Provision Proton Therapy and legislative leadership.

Gov. Bill Haslam has vetoed a measure that would have required the state's insurance plan to cover an experimental cancer treatment.

Proton therapy promises to pinpoint radiation on the places that require treatment and do less collateral damage on surrounding organs and tissue, but many providers believe it's too costly and unproven.

David Briley
File / WPLN


Nashville Mayor David Briley says he's setting to work on a new plan for mass transit in Nashville following this week's defeat of a $5.4 billion proposal featuring light rail.

Briley says he's already spoken with some opponents of the failed transit plan, and he intends to push forward with improvements to the city's bus system. He says Nashville's competitiveness depends on the city having a working transportation system.

vote election
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Beyond the transit proposal, Democratic voters in Davidson County also had a long list of primary elections to decide.

In a highly watched contest, prosecutor Ana Escobar bested former Metro Councilman Nick Leonardo for the nomination to a General Sessions judge position. Leonardo had been appointed to the seat in January, but Escobar was favorite of the Nashville Bar Association and used her expertise on domestic violence as a central point in her campaign. The General Sessions Court Division III focuses on domestic violence.

I Voted sticker Tennessee
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Voters in Williamson County may notice a prominent warning when they go to the polls today: A sign implying that only certain people are allowed to vote in the primaries.

It's the result of a dispute between the Williamson County GOP and two Democratic candidates over how to interpret Tennessee's murky law about who gets to participate in primaries. Voters don't register by party, but the law does say voters need either to be a "bona fide member and affiliated with" the party whose primary they seek to vote in, or to be willing to declare an oath of allegiance.

TN Photo Services

The Tennessee legislative session came to a late-night end last week, but some of the bills approved in the final hours might not make it all the way to becoming law.

In this week's edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and statehouse reporter Chas Sisk discuss what legislation could miss the governor’s signature, as well as other lingering issues.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Wednesday's final day of the 2018 legislative session was chaotic, even by the usual frenetic standards of the Tennessee General Assembly.

Before lawmakers adjourned at about 11 p.m., the day featured a standoff between the House and the Senate over standardized testing, an attempt to hold the state budget hostage and plenty of last-minute legislative stratagems.

Here are three reasons why the final hours of the 110th General Assembly were so hectic:

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN

Tennessee lawmakers wrapped up business Wednesday night, after an arduous final day at the state Capitol dominated by a standoff over TNReady and a dispute over a constitutional amendment.

The House of Representatives and the state Senate spent most of the day locked in a bitter dispute over whether teachers are really going to be protected from repercussions if this year's TNReady scores turn out to be flawed. Last week's exams were overshadowed by frequent interruptions. 

Janice Bowling
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee lawmakers have given initial approval to a resolution to amend the state constitution to say that "liberties do not come from government, but from Almighty God."

Nashville police
Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

The killing of four people at a Waffle House in Antioch is exposing the frequent breakdown between the law enforcement agencies that regulate gun ownership.

courtesy MNPD

Metro Nashville Police say the suspect in Sunday morning's shooting at a Waffle House in Antioch had his guns confiscated last year after being caught inside a restricted area at the White House.

Travis Reinking, 29, is still at large, and police say he still may have two guns in his possession. Police believe he fled on foot and remains shirtless but is now wearing pants.

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