Chas Sisk | Nashville Public Radio

Chas Sisk

Senior Editor

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 and became an editor in 2018. Previously, he covered state politics for Nashville Public Radio and The Tennessean, and he’s also reported on communities, politics and business for a variety of publications in Massachusetts, New York and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University, where he studied economics and journalism.

Ways to Connect

TN Photo Services

Updated at 2:06 p.m.

A measure that would require government agencies and local police in Tennessee to work with federal immigration authorities will become law, despite a vigorous campaign urging Gov. Bill Haslam to veto the measure.

Chas Sisk / WPLN

To many, a pound is a pound and a gallon is a gallon. But setting those exact standards is one of the basic functions of government.

It's even in Article I of the U.S. Constitution, alongside coining money.

Now, the state of Tennessee has a new lab — entirely dedicated to checking whether things are being weighed and measured correctly. Last week, the Department of Agriculture opened a new metrology laboratory in Nashville, and it replaces a building that was so out-of-date, federal authorities essentially said Tennesseans couldn't use it.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

Tennesseans are becoming more open to letting undocumented immigrants stay in the country — even as official federal policy has been moving in the opposite direction.

TN Photo Services

Gov. Bill Haslam is on the verge of signing a measure called the Juvenile Justice Reform Act, which was supposed to bring about major changes to how Tennessee handles young people who misbehave.

But some who worked on the measure say, after state lawmakers made last-minute changes, it's coming up far short of its promise.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

After months of deliberation, Tennessee is joining five other states and suing a major drug maker for its role in the opioid epidemic.

The suit against Purdue Pharma follows a lengthy investigation by the Tennessee attorney general into several drug companies and distributors.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN (File photo)

More than 900 voters in Williamson County crossed party lines to cast ballots in this month's Republican primary for local offices, according to the local election commission, which certified the results Monday.

The count could be a precursor to a challenge of the primary election and was taken in response to Republicans who want only voters who share their political beliefs to choose GOP candidates.

Chas Sisk / WPLN


The state’s top educator is promising next year’s standardized testing will go more smoothly — and she’s making some changes to try to bring that about.

 

Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Monday that the state is planning to strip testing vendor Questar of some of its responsibilities, following widespread outages that led many to question the validity of this year’s TNReady results.

Julieta Martinelli / WPLN

During this year's session, the Tennessee legislature passed a bill that seeks to punish "sanctuary cities," but Gov. Bill Haslam has yet to sign it. And some hope this could be the rare time he chooses to veto.

 

He’s facing pressure from those who are opposed to the measure and — from within his own party — by those who have seen anti-immigration issues be effectively used in political campaigns.

In this edition of The Tri-Star State, Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins and Chas Sisk sort through why Haslam might just issue a veto.

TN Photo Services

Narrowing the education gap will be one challenge facing whoever becomes Tennessee's next governor.

Students in the state are doing better in math and reading, but black and Hispanic students aren't improving as fast as their white counterparts.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Updated 10 p.m. with reaction from Provision Proton Therapy and legislative leadership.

Gov. Bill Haslam has vetoed a measure that would have required the state's insurance plan to cover an experimental cancer treatment.

Proton therapy promises to pinpoint radiation on the places that require treatment and do less collateral damage on surrounding organs and tissue, but many providers believe it's too costly and unproven.

Pages