Chas Sisk

Enterprise Reporter

Chas joined WPLN in 2015 after eight years with The Tennessean, including more than five years as the newspaper's statehouse reporter. Chas has also covered communities, politics and business in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C. Chas grew up in South Carolina and attended Columbia University in New York, where he studied economics and journalism. Outside of work, he's a dedicated distance runner, having completed a dozen marathons.

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Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Hundreds of bills are filed when the Tennessee legislature revs up at the first of the year. And dozens of them attract attention — sometimes from around the country. But this year, most of those headline-grabbing proposals quietly fizzled out. WPLN’s statehouse reporter Chas Sisk joins Blake Farmer to walk through what happened to some of them.

Tilman Goins
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

A proposal meant to give lawmakers more opportunities to override vetoes of controversial legislation could be tripped up by a separate measure that would dramatically increase how much money state senators can raise.

The dispute between the Tennessee House of Representatives and the state Senate could come to a showdown as lawmakers wrap up this year's legislative session.

Dawn White
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

Lawmakers have again rejected a proposal to offer in-state tuition to undocumented students who graduate from Tennessee high schools.

The plan was debated for the second time in three years, and there had been some signs it might have a chance of passing. But skeptics say they're still unwilling to extend any benefits to people who came to the U.S. illegally, even children.

Beth Harwell
Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

It was beginning to look last week like the road was finally beginning to clear for Governor Bill Haslam’s transportation plan and gas tax hike.

Then, some legislative leaders from the governor's own party cut in.

Now, the Tennessee legislature is set for what could be a make-or-break week.

Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins sat down with statehouse reporter Chas Sisk to lay out the route ahead.

Tennessee Titans Nissan Stadium seating
Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

A measure that would have let off-duty police officers carry guns into any ticketed event was voted down Wednesday in the state legislature.

The broadly worded proposal was designed to override policies banning guns at private fundraisers, music festivals, even Tennessee Titans games.

Tennessee General Assembly

Tennessee lawmakers are delaying until next year a proposal to define anti-Semitic speech on college campuses.

The move came after several University of Tennessee-Knoxville students testified Wednesday that hate speech is not a problem at their school.

Blake Farmer / WPLN (File photo)

A measure that would require Tennessee school buses to have seatbelts is moving forward after weeks of discussion in the state legislature.

The proposal comes in response to last November's crash in Chattanooga that killed six children. The plan calls for phasing in seatbelts on new buses starting in 2019.

Stephen Jerkins / WPLN (File photo)

A group of Republican lawmakers is trying to hit reset on the debate over Governor Bill Haslam’s transportation proposal.

They say House leaders are moving the plan for a 6-cent increase to the state’s gas tax through the legislature too quickly.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee legislators have once again been revisiting the state's gun laws. Past years have seen them authorize guns in parks, guns in bars, and even on college campuses, though with many restrictions.

So what's next? Nashville Public Radio's Jason Moon Wilkins sat down with statehouse reporter Chas Sisk to talk about that.

Chas Sisk / WPLN (File photo)

Immigrants who've entered the country illegally face an uncertain future in the U.S., but that hasn't stopped Tennessee lawmakers from again considering an idea that could help many of them.

A proposal to give in-state college tuition to undocumented students who graduate from Tennessee high schools is once more gaining steam.

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