Blake Farmer | Nashville Public Radio

Blake Farmer

News Director

Blake Farmer is Nashville Public Radio's news director. While he still makes time for some reporting, he's the primary editor of WPLN's on-air stories. When he's in the field, his reporting focuses on education and the military. But a good story is a good story, which is why he's also done pieces about frog gigging and churches holding gun raffles. 

Blake grew up in East Nashville, attending Lipscomb Academy. He went to college in Texas at Abilene Christian University, where he cut his teeth in radio at KACU-FM. Before joining WPLN full time in 2007, Blake also wrote for the Nashville City Paper. He's an active member and past-president of the Society of Professional Journalists Middle Tennessee Chapter. And he keeps his audio recorder with him, even on vacation, just in case there's a story to be told.

Ways to Connect

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Metro General Hospital has decided to defiantly resist closure, which was proposed by Mayor Megan Barry last week. In the meantime, the facility is trying to keep nurses, doctors and administrators from abandoning ship.

courtesy Williamson Medical Center

The Williamson County Commission has again turned back an effort to sell its publicly owned hospital. Off and on for years, the panel has been considering the prospect of cashing out, but this week it rejected a proposal to put the question to a referendum vote.

courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Veterans Affairs hospitals are taking a page from the pharmaceutical playbook — and reversing it. They've hired what are effectively 285 drug company representatives across the country, including one for every VA hospital in Tennessee and Kentucky. But instead of encouraging physicians to prescribe, they're often counseling doctors against giving their patients opioids.

Tony Gonzalez / WPLN

Williamson County voters will decide early next year whether to raise the local sales tax by half a cent to help fund the school district. The local option rate would go from 2.25 to 2.75 cents if approved.

Blake Farmer / WPLN (File photo)

Tennessee's Health Department is hiring special investigators to keep tabs on the state's compounding pharmacies, which make small-batch, custom drugs. The move is partially in response to the deadly fungal meningitis outbreak of 2012.

Jennifer Clampet / Army Medicine via Flickr

Researchers are turning to Tennessee to find a middle ground on the use of opioids for treating chronic pain. A new study is recruiting 1,000 patients in Tennessee and North Carolina who are taking opioids for chronic pain — a move that comes at a time of conflicting opinions about whether addictive narcotics should even be used to treat long-term pain, unless it's cancer-related.

David Goehring / via Flickr

TennCare has tightened controls on opioid prescriptions in recent years, and the state's Medicaid program plans to go a step further next year. It's an effort to decrease the use of highly addictive narcotics — and save some money.

Blake Farmer / WPLN

Mayor Megan Barry revealed a plan on Thursday to entirely restructure Metro General Hospital. She called an announcement that Meharry Medical College was moving its students to another facility an "opportunity to revisit" the business model of General Hospital.

courtesy CMA

This year's Country Music Association Awards were meant to provide healing for an industry shaken by the massacre at a festival in Las Vegas last month. Wednesday night's show paid tribute to the fans who became victims, but it also reinforced how few of the artists want to talk about the gun debate reignited by the tragedy.

Courtesy Russell Moore via Facebook

The head the Southern Baptist Convention's political arm says there's no gun control policy outlined in the Bible. And so the powerful Nashville-based denomination isn't taking a position, even after more than 20 members of a Texas congregation were murdered in their own sanctuary on Sunday.

Pages