Stories From NPR

03/24/17: A new way to withdraw money from the ATM

14 hours ago
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Marketplace

Wells Fargo is going to start letting customers withdraw money from ATMs using their smartphones, no debit card required. We'll chat with the Tiffany Rad, the CEO and founder of the security firm Anatrope, about whether this method of transaction is actually safe. Afterwards, we'll play this week's Silicon Tally with Vanity Fair's Maya Kosoff, and then look at the Senate's decision to scrap various user privacy rules for Internet Service Providers. 

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Marketplace

The Senate has voted to put a stop to rules from the Obama administration that would prevent internet providers like Comcast and Verizon from selling your browsing data. We'll look at how these regulations were supposed to protect your privacy. Next, we'll talk about Wells Fargo's decision to allow customers to withdraw money from ATMs using their phones, and then explore the federal government's difficult recruiting young tech workers.

typing_2.jpg
Marketplace

The Senate has voted to put a stop to rules from the Obama administration that would prevent internet providers like Comcast and Verizon from selling your browsing data. We'll look at how these regulations were supposed to protect your privacy. Next, we'll talk about Wells Fargo's decision to allow customers to withdraw money from ATMs using their phones, and then explore the federal government's difficult recruiting young tech workers.

Sound Opinions: Remembering Chuck Berry

16 hours ago

Chuck Berry, one of the architects of rock 'n' roll, has died at age 90. Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot reflect on the life, music, and enduring legacy of the legendary guitarist and singer.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And to help us understand what's happening on Capitol Hill tonight, I am joined by NPR's Ron Elving. Hello there, Ron.

RON ELVING, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Kelly.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Oleksandr Synytsia/Reuters 

"An act of state terrorism by Russia."

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko did not mince words about neighboring Russia following the assassination of an outspoken Kremlin critic in Kiev.

Denis Voronenkov, 45, was gunned down in broad daylight in front of a luxury hotel in the center of the city Thursday. He was a former member of the Russian parliament before he renounced his citizenship and emigrated last October to Ukraine where he became a citizen.

Post-Fidel-Castro Cuba isn't that different from before

21 hours ago

For years, opponents of Cuba’s socialist revolution pegged the system’s downfall to the inevitable death of its leader, Fidel Castro. Yet, months after Castro’s death, there have been no major protests on the streets of Havana, no popular uprising against the ruling Communist Party.

As Gladys Esther Marta Luís can attest. She's a manicurist who is currently unemployed. For her, things have continued on much like they were before. Since the former president's death in November, she said, “I don’t see any changes,” adding, “Life seems the same to me.”

London comes together to remember its victims

22 hours ago
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Hannah McKay

Hundreds of people paid tribute in central London on Thursday to the victims of a terror attack outside British Parliament a day earlier that left four dead, including a police officer and the attacker, and dozens injured.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan led the tributes in a heavily policed Trafalgar Square, vowing "Londoners will never be cowed by terrorism" after a 52-year-old UK-born man went on the rampage at Westminster.

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