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Stories From NPR

More of your trade questions, answered

Jun 22, 2018

Amid all the chaos and controversy at the southwest border, there's still a trade war brewing on multiple fronts. Today on the show, we'll tackle more of your questions about all things tariffs and trade. Then: Street vending in Los Angeles is a half-billion-dollar industry that’s illegal. We'll look at the tangled relationship between street vendors and the law. But first, AMC's challenger to MoviePass, the latest on Mexico's elections and, of course, the Weekly Wrap.

On a recent afternoon in Los Angeles’ wholesale district, Ashley Roberts is crouched beside a sidewalk display of clothes, DVDs and phone accessories. What she’s doing is illegal, but Roberts said getting a good spot determines whether she’ll make enough money to eat today.

“It all depends what area you set up at, whether the cops are going to bug with you,” Roberts said.

Roberts has already received two citations in the few months she’s been street vending. She’s also regularly negotiating with businesses, like the sunglass wholesaler she sells in front of.

Almost 40 million people in the United States have a disability, according to 2015 U.S. Census figures, but the language used around disabilities can be a mystery, fraught with acronyms and legalese. We’ve defined a few of those terms to help you navigate the world of disabilities.

With Anthony Brooks

How can classic rock survive when its stars are aging and dying?

It’s been another busy week on social media, with users sharing photos of protests as migrant parents waited to be reunited with their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. First lady Melania Trump also caused a firestorm over a jacket she wore to visit a children’s shelter in Texas. And New Zealand’s Prime Minister gave birth to a baby girl — and Twitter is celebrating.

The Department of Justice has asked a federal court to modify a court settlement that restricts the federal government from detaining migrant children indefinitely or in prison-like conditions.

Antonio Godinez Vera makes his living turning golden kernels of Mexican corn into a mash that becomes tortillas. People like Godinez, a small business owner with four employees, are part of a wave that could power Andrés Manuel López Obrador to the Mexican presidency when voters elect a new head of state on July 1.

I live in Denver, Colorado, 1,500 miles from the border with Mexico.

But in May and June of this year, I cared for three toddlers, each 1 to 2 years old, who were separated from their parents at the border. They were my patients. All of the information I learned about them, I obtained from their foster parents. While I have no way to independently verify what I was told, I also have no reason to doubt the information that I was given.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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