Stories From NPR

The oil giant BP opened a gas station in the outskirts of Mexico City in March.

On the surface it doesn’t sound like much. But it also happens to be the first global retail brand to operate a fueling station in Mexico since the country began loosening restrictive energy policies that date back to the 1930s.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd takes a closer look at where the new station fits in the Mexican government’s efforts to open the country’s energy market.

President Trump proposed dramatic cuts in corporate and personal taxes Wednesday in an overhaul his administration asserts will spur national economic growth and bring jobs and prosperity to America’s middle class. But his ambitious plan is alarming lawmakers who worry it will balloon federal deficits.

NPR economics correspondent John Ydstie (@jey51) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to go over the details.

Sarmad Gilani was working at Google’s offices in San Francisco one morning when he received a message that two cops were waiting for him in Google’s lobby.

The 31-year-old software engineer at Google figured the officers just wanted to talk about an unpaid parking ticket. But Gilani also wondered if the officers had a more complicated motive.

“Just in case they throw me in Guantanamo, please bail me out,” he told a co-worker.

About 1 million Americans live in Mexico, and many of them do so illegally. But it’s much easier to navigate life in Mexico as an immigrant without proper documents than it is in the United States.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson explores this with two people who have firsthand experience with the differences.

Editor’s Note: Here & Now agreed not to use our guests’ last names for this conversation.

Interview Highlights

On Eddie’s immigration story and the limitations of his status

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Courtesy of the Bailey family

A controversial child trafficking trial starts this Thursday for a 64-year-old American woman who throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s placed hundreds of Guatemalan children with American families. If convicted, she could face more than a decade in prison.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

It’s looking unlikely that Congress will take up immigration reform this fall.

But the push is still on to put deportations and immigrant detention centers under the microscope. And some of those leading this effort are immigrants themselves — who’ve spent time in detention centers — and are organizing to support those still inside.

Luis Nolasco was nine when his parents brought him to California from Mexico.

Back then, his family’s “undocumented” status meant little to him, but that changed his senior year of high school.

ESPN announced a long-awaited round of layoffs today. About 100 staff members are expected to be let go, including on-air reporters and commentators. The cuts are a clear sign of the new economic reality facing live sports broadcasting.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

What the "Spinal Tap" lawsuit means for Hollywood

23 hours ago
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Adrienne Hill and Maria Hollenhorst

"This is Spinal Tap," the mockumentary about a fictional heavy-metal band, paved the way for a genre of docu-style films and TV shows, like "Best in Show," "The Office" and "Modern Family." But much like the fictional band’s failed entrance to onto a Cleveland Stage, when "This is Spinal Tap" was released in 1984, its box office take was a letdown. But in the years since it opened, it’s become a classic.

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