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Stories From NPR

Her workplace was not a safe place, and despite being a teenager, Katalina knew this for certain. It didn’t feel OK that her bosses touched her, said sexual things and propositioned her constantly. But she saw it happen to other women, too. Even changing jobs didn’t help. New bosses in new work sites did the same awful things, she said.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

NFL owners may be headed for a showdown

Nov 17, 2017

This has not been the greatest of seasons for the NFL.

There's been the political turmoil over players taking a knee during the national anthem, the declining television audiences, and there's now some boardroom drama in a $14 billion-a-year enterprise. Jerry Jones, the owner of the Dallas Cowboys, is in a back and forth with his fellow owners over whether to renew Commissioner Roger Goodell's contract.

So far, Jones has tried to slow or halt the negotiations. And his interference is threatening to become a PR problem for the NFL. 

Our roundtable — Margaret Brennan of CBS, Aaron Blake of the Washington Post and On Point news analyst Jack Beatty — take on the week’s news: Women accuse Roy Moore and Sen. Al Franken. Tax bill looks to gut Obamacare. Jeff Sessions talks Russia.

Guests:

Margaret Brennan, White House and senior foreign affairs correspondent for CBS News. (@margbrennan)

What’s peanut butter?

That’s the question the Food and Drug Administration was trying to answer in 1959. You’d think it’d be an easy one. They did too.

Federal regulators first set the definition of peanut butter at 95 percent peanuts, five percent sweeteners, oils, and other stuff. Because that’s what peanut butter is, the FDA reasoned. It’s peanuts.

What they didn’t know is that first, short memo would set off a long, complicated legal battle that would change the way we think about food in this country.

This week we're taking a new look at some favorite stories we've covered this year — and what's happened since. We're taking a look at whether states are constitutionally obligated to teach kids how to read, the consequences of ID theft, and how digital apps like Instagram are changing the physical world. Plus, veggie delights for Thanksgiving and the growth of vegan food chains. 

Every time there's a mass shooting in the US, the same question comes up. Does the availability of guns lead to such tragedies?

(Markets Edition) With Republicans racing to approve legislation that would overhaul America's tax system, we'll hear from Diane Swonk — CEO of DS Economics — about the math behind the plan. These tax cuts could end up adding to the deficit, which Swonk says will create "liabilities" for future generations.

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