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Stories From NPR

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This evening, Republican lawmakers released the final version of tax legislation that's been making its way through Congress for the past several weeks.

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Feisal Omar/Reuters

Ninety-two Somali immigrants, set to be deported from the US, found themselves shackled at the hands and feet and kept aboard a plane for two days earlier this month. That part of the story is not in dispute.

The Somalis left Louisiana on Dec. 7. Their flight, chartered by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, was bound for Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia. But the plane never arrived.

After landing in Dakar, Senegal, on Africa's west coast, the one-way flight became a round trip, back to the US. Why that happened, though, remains subject to dispute. 

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Gene Blevins/Reuters

It’s been more than 250 days since it last rained in southern California.

Approximately 8,000 firefighters continue to battle massive wildfires, like the record-setting Thomas Fire.

Related: Firefighters race to get control of California wildfires

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Reuters/AAP/Lukas Coch 

“A national tragedy.”

That’s how the Australian prime minister characterized the findings, released Friday, of a five-year investigation into child sexual abuse.

Malcolm Turnbull on Friday extended his gratitude to thousands of survivors who were brave enough to tell their stories. “It’s been very tough, often harrowing work,"  he said, "but above all I want to thank and honor the courage of the survivors and their families who’ve told, often for the first time, the dreadful stories of abuse that they received from people who actually owed them love and protection."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

What happens when your designer-in-chief resigns?

10 hours ago

The first chief creative officer at Diane Von Furstenberg left his job today. Jonathan Saunders lasted 18 months as the venerated fashion outfit's head designer. His two predecessors, who did not share the same title, didn't last much longer. The company also happens to have been without a CEO since November 2016. The troubles at DVF reflect the fashion industries larger struggles. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke with fashion writer Elizabeth Holmes to get a better sense of where the industry stands. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

The Department of Homeland Security has announced plans to reverse an Obama administration immigration rule. This one applies to the spouses of H-1B visa holders. The H1-B, you may recall, goes to skilled workers, often in the tech sector. The Obama administration gave the OK for the spouses of some of these skilled workers to get their own legal jobs in the U.S. DHS gave notice yesterday that it intends to end that work authorization. Here’s why.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Regulatory “Ping-Pong” no game for businesses

10 hours ago

The Federal Communications Commission voted yesterday to get rid of Obama-era net neutrality rules that were just over two years old. It was a similar story over at the National Labor Relations Board, where some Obama-era rules that unions liked, and companies didn't, have gone away. Politics aside, this kind of big switch, when a new administration comes in and changes the composition of the commissioners at regulatory agencies, results in substantial regulatory uncertainty for big chunks of the American economy.

MC Afrikan Boy's 'Wot It Do?' is a call to action

11 hours ago
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Derrick Kakembo 

MC Afrikan Boy, Olushola Ajose, returns with his latest track, "Wot it Do?" It’s a danceable, club-ready track that aims to bring people to the dance floor.

The Southeast London Afrogrime musician bursts with energy, pairing neatly woven references to childhood nursery rhymes with a range of influences within grime, early afrobeat and Nigerian juju.

Under my bed, I have a box stuffed with high school memories, including a bright orange binder, labeled “Warning, this is not school-related."

Inside, there are pages and pages of deeply meaningful conversations I had on AOL Instant Messenger, full of gossip, flirting and those tortured goodbyes. Like this one: 

Sweetnsour435 — that was me. 

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