History

Nashville Artist’s Unusual Lincoln Portrait To Hang At Ford’s Theatre

Nashville Artist’s Unusual Lincoln Portrait To Hang At Ford’s Theatre

by / on April 15, 2014

Wayne Brezinka’s multi-media portrait is partly constructed of historical artifacts from the 1860s.

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As we expect President Obama in Nashville today, we started looking at past presidential visits. This photograph, now stuck to its frame was a staple in my household growing up. Like President Obama, As we expect President Obama in Nashville today, we started looking at past presidential visits. This photograph of my sister giving birthday flowers to Pat Nixon was a staple in my household growing up. Like President Obama, Richard Nixon was in the 5th year of his presidency when he visited nearly 40 years ago.Richard Nixon was in the 5th year of his presidency when he visited nearly 40 years ago.

The Day My Sister Greeted The Nixons At Nashville’s Airport

by / on January 30, 2014

As President Obama will be in Nashville today, we remember another presidential visit from 40 years ago: a celebration with a side of Watergate.

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Player Who Integrated Nashville Basketball Honored With Jersey Retirement

Player Who Integrated Nashville Basketball Honored With Jersey Retirement

by / on November 19, 2013

This year marks a half-century since Father Ryan’s basketball team first took the court with an integrated team. Willie Brown was a junior at the time.

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Remembering A Civil War Memorial As Old As The War Itself

Remembering A Civil War Memorial As Old As The War Itself

by / on May 24, 2013

Most Civil War monuments were built long after the fighting ended. But roughly 150 years ago, a group of soldiers from Ohio and Indiana honored their fallen comrades with a substantial stone structure that still stands on the outskirts of Murfreesboro.

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Memorial Day Look Back: Nashville POW Wrote State Poem In Vietnamese Prison

Memorial Day Look Back: Nashville POW Wrote State Poem In Vietnamese Prison

by / on May 24, 2013

It’s been four decades since one of Nashville’s war heroes made it home from Vietnam. The late Rear Admiral William Lawrence spent more than 2-thousand days as a prisoner of war in the notorious “Hanoi Hilton.” He came back with a gift for his home state.

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Credit: Nina Cardona/WPLN

How Does The Music City Center Compare To Previous Nashville Building Projects?

by / on May 16, 2013

The Music City Center is Nashville’s largest public building project, costing at least $585 million. Here’s a look back at previous major projects and their cost to taxpayers.

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Civil Rights Art Project Seeks Local Voices

Civil Rights Art Project Seeks Local Voices

by / on March 10, 2013

The Metro Arts Commission is hoping for a strong turnout this week at a workshop about Nashville’s Civil Rights history. The next piece of public art is meant to honor the lunch counter sit ins of the 60s, and officials say public input is a key piece of getting it right.

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Civil Rights Leader Donates Historic Letters to Vanderbilt

Civil Rights Leader Donates Historic Letters to Vanderbilt

by / on February 19, 2013

A hero of the Civil Rights movement is donating a massive trove of personal letters and memorabilia to Vanderbilt University. Reverend James Lawson was once kicked out of Vanderbilt for his role in Nashville’s historic lunch-counter sit-ins. Lawson says he’s wanted the school to have the collection for decades.

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A Rare Chance to See the Emancipation Proclamation

A Rare Chance to See the Emancipation Proclamation

by / on February 12, 2013

The document that freed thousands of Southern slaves 150 years ago is at the Tennessee State Museum this week. The original Emancipation Proclamation is the centerpiece of an exhibit on Civil War history that opened Tuesday.

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Proposed Bill Carries Echoes of Old Hickory-Era Crisis

Proposed Bill Carries Echoes of Old Hickory-Era Crisis

by / on January 17, 2013

If one Tennessee legislator gets his way, federal agents could be arrested for enforcing any potential assault weapons ban. But the concept of a state trying to cancel out federal measures was already tried 180 years ago. And the president who squashed that effort was one of Nashville’s most famous residents.

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Emancipation Proclamation Didn’t Free Tennessee Slaves

by / on December 31, 2012

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. President Abraham Lincoln’s executive order is commonly thought of as being responsible for freeing America’s slaves, but the truth is more complex, especially in Tennessee.

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Battle of Stones River

Battle of Stones River

by / on December 31, 2012

When President Abraham Lincoln needed to bolster public opinion at the end of 1862, his best hope was a Civil War victory in the heart of Tennessee.

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R.H. Boyd Statue Stolen

R.H. Boyd Statue Stolen

by / on December 19, 2012

A life size bronze statue of publisher R.H. Boyd has been stolen and detectives with Metro Police are offering a cash reward for information.

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State Constitutions on Rare Display

State Constitutions on Rare Display

by / on December 3, 2012

Tennessee’s original, handwritten Constitutions will be exhibited later this week to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the state’s Supreme Court Building.

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Timothy Demonbreun: Nashville’s Man of Mystery

Timothy Demonbreun: Nashville’s Man of Mystery

by / on November 5, 2012

Demonbreun Street is named for Jacques-Timothée Boucher, Sieur de Montbrun–better known as Timothy Demonbreun. His Nashville story doesn’t begin on a battlefield or a plantation. It starts in a cave, hidden below an industrial park off Lebanon Pike.

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Southern Festival Adds Emancipation Track

Southern Festival Adds Emancipation Track

by / on October 12, 2012

Humanities Tennessee is gearing up for a series of statewide events about Civil Rights and the Civil War. It kicks off at this weekend’s Southern Festival of Books with a set of discussions, talks and readings marking the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

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Chance to See Historic Document Hinges on Lottery

by / on September 10, 2012

The original Emancipation Proclamation is coming to the Tennessee State Museum for just seven days early next year. The only way for any school to schedule a field trip is to enter a lottery.

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Fort Negley and the Hope of Freedom

Fort Negley and the Hope of Freedom

by / on August 20, 2012

Listen Now: Nashville’s Fort Negley was built for war, and construction began 150 years ago this month. Union officers considered the stone fortress a show of strength and military might. Instead, the fort’s enduring story belongs to the black laborers, both slave and free, who were forced to build it.

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Battle of Franklin Tour Available By Phone

by / on July 23, 2012

History buffs can now tour Franklin’s civil war battle sites using their cell phones. It’s long taken a little extra effort to picture the historic events, since what was once a battlefield is now largely covered by development. To help make things more clear, the city’s parks department has erected signs at eleven key locations.

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A New Chance to Listen to a Pivotal Moment

A New Chance to Listen to a Pivotal Moment

by / on July 5, 2012

Recordings of key leaders in the civil rights movement are newly available online. The conversations from the mid-1960s hint at shifts that were coming in the struggle for racial equality.

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