Articles by: Nina Cardona

Brad Postlethwaite plays with his band, Snowglobe, on an episode of $5 Cover. He's one of several Memphis musicians who played fictional versions of themselves on the MTV web drama. Credit: MTV

Memphis Named A Top Place For Making Movies

by / on January 8, 2014

A Tennessee city is back on an industry ranking of the best places for filmmakers–and it’s not Nashville.

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Credit Jack Newton via Flickr

Nashville Groups Patrol Streets, Helping Those Who Won’t Accept Shelter

by / on January 6, 2014

The number of Nashvillians sleeping in shelters exceeded 1,200 Sunday night. But even with a forecast that calls for a windchill of ten below, some homeless people refuse to come inside.

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Cows also benefit from a dry coat of hair and good layer of fat, but American Cattlemen magazine says the key component to protecting them in cold weather is increasing the amount of food available. Credit Annie Kavanagh via Flickr

Need To Keep Cattle Warm In Frigid Temperatures? Feed Them

by / on January 6, 2014

Cold weather like what’s moved into Tennessee is dangerous for any living creature stuck outside. But for livestock, the solution may not be about finding shelter.

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As of Friday afternoon, the National Weather service is calling for a sharp temperature drop to happen Sunday night. Earlier in the weekend, there will likely be precipitation, but the forecast does not include any accumulation of ice.

Low Temps Dangerous For People But Not A Problem For Power Companies

by / on January 3, 2014

Middle Tennesseans are bracing as the forecast calls for temperatures to drop into the teens and single digits.

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Tennessee Trying To Bury More Rural Veterans Close To Home And Family

Tennessee Trying To Bury More Rural Veterans Close To Home And Family

by / on January 3, 2014

The state is trying to eliminate the choice between a free burial and a grave that’s close enough for family to visit.

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In his resignation letter, Hall says '“We could have been happy at Austin Peay for many more years. Yet, I

doubted whether I could do the job the University deserves across that long a period.' Image via APSU

Moving On From Austin Peay, President Says University Needs Someone Else Now

by / on January 2, 2014

The man who lead Austin Peay State University through seven years of growth is moving on to another school. President Tim Hall announced today he’s taken the job as president of Mercy College in New York state.

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The cost of a specialty tag in Tennessee is $35 more than a standard-issue one. In almost every case, either 40 or 80% of that fee is designated for the Tennessee Arts Commission, and specifically must be spent on grants to artists and arts organizations in the state. Credit: Nina Cardona/WPLN

How Tennessee Car Dealers Could Help Fund The Arts

by / on December 31, 2013

License plates fund hundreds of grants to artists around the state each year. And while arts grants are one of the first things trimmed in state budget cuts, car tags provide a revenue stream that isn’t subject to the shifting political climate.

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Credit: Tracy Hunter via Flickr

Tennessee Ends Prevailing Wage Protection For Building Projects

by / on December 30, 2013

Starting January 1st, most government building projects in Tennessee won’t have to pay workers a prevailing wage anymore. The longstanding protection was lifted this year, despite warnings that it could mean a 10 to 15 percent pay cut for the state’s laborers.

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John Templeton took the buy low, sell high mantra to its most extreme and prospered as a result. Image Source: Templeton.org

How A Small Town Tennessean Won Mutual Fund Fame, Even A Knighthood

by / on December 27, 2013

Selling fireworks and homemade wine in Winchester, Tennessee is not the classic path to becoming a Wall Street superstar, but that’s how John Templeton got his start. The mutual fund pioneer died a few years ago, but the story of his life is the subject of a documentary airing tonight on business channel Bloomberg TV.

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Vanderbilt Anesthesiologists Mark Newton, M.D., far left, and Kelly McQueen, M.D., in white coat, celebrate with a graduating class of Kenyan Registered Nurse Anesthetists at Kijabe Hospital. Image Source: Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Why Is Vanderbilt Training Nurse Anesthetists In Kenya?

by / on December 26, 2013

Some of Vanderbilt’s nursing students don’t learn on campus or even in Nashville. As WPLN’s Nina Cardona reports, the Medical Center is getting ready to more than double the size of a program based in rural Kenya, with hopes of making surgery safer in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Bring It To A Vote Or Not,  Tennessee’s Senators Both Dislike Budget Bill

Bring It To A Vote Or Not, Tennessee’s Senators Both Dislike Budget Bill

by / on December 17, 2013

Neither of Tennessee’s Senators support the Budget compromise sent over from the House. But as the bill passed a procedural hurdle today, the pair of Republicans took very different approaches.

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Time To Slow Spending and Close Schools, Say Nashville Mayor, Chamber

Time To Slow Spending and Close Schools, Say Nashville Mayor, Chamber

by / on December 16, 2013

After years of expanding budgets that fund efforts to turn around struggling schools, city and business leaders agree it’s time to change focus. Instead of adding resources, Mayor Karl Dean and the Chamber of Commerce both suggest Metro Schools start shifting them away from programs that just aren’t working.

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Credit: davef3138 via Flickr

Nashville Newspaper Hoping To Woo Younger Crowd: Let’s Party

by / on December 16, 2013

The written word is only part of the latest effort in Nashville from The Tennessean’s parent company.

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Towns Can’t Legally Require Prescriptions For Cold Drug Used To Make Meth, Says State’s Top Lawyer

Towns Can’t Legally Require Prescriptions For Cold Drug Used To Make Meth, Says State’s Top Lawyer

by / on December 10, 2013

Tennessee’s Attorney General says state law prohibits local governments from setting their own rules for buying medicines that can be used to make methamphetamine.

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The proposed new ballpark would face downtown from 4th Avenue near Jefferson Street. (Image via Mayor Karl Dean's office)

Make Sure Ballpark Employs Nashvillians, Council Tells Mayor

by / on December 10, 2013

Before taking their final vote to approve a new baseball stadium, Metro Council members sent a message to Mayor Karl Dean Tuesday: make sure this construction project creates good jobs for people who live in Nashville.

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Should Tennessee Schools Be Graded With Data From An Optional Test?

Should Tennessee Schools Be Graded With Data From An Optional Test?

by / on December 9, 2013

Last year, Tullahoma City Schools gave its youngest students a standardized test that districts weren’t required to use. Now, the superintendent says that was a mistake he doesn’t want to make again.

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This initial artist's rendering shows the retail space at the corner, with the museum rising in black farther down Broadway. The tower sits farther back on the 5th Avenue side. Credit: Gresham Smith & Partners

Out With The Old Nashville Convention Center, In With A $230M Skyscraper

by / on December 4, 2013

Nashville officials have chosen a development team to replace the old convention hall with a million square foot, mixed-use tower.

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The project employed more than twice as many construction workers as originally anticipated. About a quarter of the money went to small contracting firms or those that are owned by women or minorities. Credit: Stephen Jerkins

Nashville’s Music City Center Only Cost $577M, Not Counting That $15M Lawsuit

by / on December 3, 2013

Officially, Nashville’s largest ever public building project came in under budget, but only because additional court-ordered costs were handled from a different pot of money.

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Forest Life Comes Into Focus In Single Square Meter Of Tennessee Woods

Forest Life Comes Into Focus In Single Square Meter Of Tennessee Woods

by / on December 2, 2013

Imagine one square meter of empty forest floor. If you looked at it long enough, what would you notice? Biologist David Haskell has been doing exactly that in Sewanee for roughly a decade, and he’s noticed enough to fill a book.

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How Long Does It Take To Replace A State Computer System? 20 Years, In The Case Of One Agency

How Long Does It Take To Replace A State Computer System? 20 Years, In The Case Of One Agency

by / on December 2, 2013

If everything goes according to schedule, a new computer system will go online next year for tracking the services Tennessee provides to people with disabilities–but it’s twenty years overdue.

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