Anti-UAW Workers Rush To Form Volkswagen Union

Volkswagen's workers voted in February and narrowly rejected representation by the UAW following intense pressure from Republican politicians. Credit: VW

Volkswagen’s workers voted in February and narrowly rejected representation by the UAW following intense pressure from Republican politicians. Credit: VW

Workers who fought off the United Auto Workers earlier this year are now trying to form their own union at Volkswagen’s Chattanooga plant.

In February, the United Auto Workers narrowly lost a vote to organize the VW plant. Among the opposition were workers who set up a website called No2UAW. Videos on the site painted the national union as a predatory business connected to liberal politicians who many at the plant may not like.

“We don’t need the UAW or any other outside union for that matter to start a works council. We can do it ourselves.”

So now, the same workers who fought against the UAW want to create their own union from scratch. The so-called American Council of Employees would represent both hourly and salaried workers. To trigger a vote, they need nearly a third of the plant’s workforce to sign their petition.

But organizers say they have to move fast. They’re worried the UAW may soon be granted office space on the VW campus, a move that could potentially give the national group a leg up in recruiting.

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