Nashville Officials Say: Be Nice to Your Neighbors, Stop Watering Your Grass

Emergency officials deliver cases of bottled water to Hillsboro High School after a pipe failure left over 15,000 Davidson County Residents without water.

Emergency officials deliver cases of bottled water to Hillsboro High School after a pipe failure left over 15,000 Davidson County Residents without water. Credit: Leah Johnson/WPLN

Metro officials have implemented a strict “no-irrigation” policy in neighborhoods affected by a water main break.

Failure of a large pipe that delivers water to Green Hills, Oak Hill, parts of Creive Hall and Forrest Hills lead to an extreme drop in water pressure in those areas. Temporary pumping stations are diverting enough water for necessary uses—cooking, drinking, bathing—but Metro Water Services director, Scott Potter says that the only way to maintain water flow is to cut off all non-essential uses until a more permanent solution is put in place.

So, Potter says, no one in those neighborhoods should be washing cars or watering lawns.

“And if we see an irrigation system operating we’re gonna stop and ask them to turn it off. Essentially we’re just asking everyone to be nice to their neighbors,” Potter says.

While most residents have regained their normal water access, Potter says that those in the highest points of the area are still experiencing some difficulty. Drinking water will continue to be available at both Hillsboro High School and Crieve Hall Elementary School.

Nina Cardona contributed to this report.

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