Rideshare Company Uber Expands Into Franklin And Brentwood

Lyft and competitor Uber (app pictured above) have both been hustling for market share in Nashville since they arrived late last year, giving out free credit for rides and trying to get riders to tell their friends. (Screen shot: Daniel Potter)

Lyft and competitor Uber (app pictured above) have both been hustling for market share in Nashville since they arrived late last year, giving out free credit for rides and trying to get riders to tell their friends. (Screen shot: Daniel Potter)

One of the app-based taxi services new to Middle Tennessee is expanding into Williamson County. Reaching into the suburbs is one of Uber’s new initiatives.

Uber spokeswoman Jena Wuu says many Franklin and Brentwood residents have been disappointed to discover they’re outside the service area.

“A lot of people based in the Franklin area are opening the app, looking for rides, they’re looking for safe, reliable, convenient ways to get around town, to get into Nashville safely without having to worry where they’re going to park their cars.”

Uber says its rides are on average 10 percent cheaper than nomal taxis.

A dispatcher from Nashville’s Yellow Cab company said a trip from downtown Nashville to downtown Franklin will cost around $45 — plus tip. That’s slightly more than what Uber plans to charge ($33-$44, tip included) for its basic service. But maybe not on weekends or peak hours, when Uber’s rates often go up.

In recent months, Uber has extended its service into the suburbs of Chicago and Baltimore. Spokeswoman Wuu said Uber’s goal is to be “everywhere.” The company operates in 110 cities, which is much to the chagrin of taxi companies.

Since Uber came into the Nashville area last year, legal questions have swirled, including over regulations and insurance polices.

In other cities, such as San Antonio, Uber has encountered fiercer legal resistance. There, local ordinances ban rideshare companies like Uber, and its competitor, Lyft.

 

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